The Effects of Homeownership on Children's Outcomes

Real Effects or Self-Selection?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines whether there is a "homeownership effect" for lower-income racial and ethnic groups who have been the target of public policies to expand homeownership. We use two different methods to account for selection, statistical matching and instrumental variable analysis; test direct and indirect (mediator) effects of homeownership on children's cognitive achievement, behavior problems and health using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and its Child Development Supplement; and replicate the main effects tests using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. We find little evidence of beneficial homeownership effects and suggest that previous analyses may have mistaken selection differences for the effect of homeownership itself.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)566-602
Number of pages37
JournalReal Estate Economics
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Self-selection
Home ownership
Health
Mediator
Child development
Instrumental variables
Ethnic groups
Public policy
Panel study
Income
Low income

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance
  • Accounting
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

The Effects of Homeownership on Children's Outcomes : Real Effects or Self-Selection? / Holupka, Charles Scott; Newman, Sandra J.

In: Real Estate Economics, Vol. 40, No. 3, 09.2012, p. 566-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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