THE EFFECTS OF A COOPERATION CONTINGENCY ON BEHAVIOR IN A CONTINUOUS THREE‐PERSON ENVIRONMENT

Henry H. Emurian, Cleeve S. Emurian, George E. Bigelow, Joseph V. Brady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Five groups of three subjects resided for 10 or 15 days within a continuously programmed environment. Subjects followed a programmatic arrangement of required and optional private and social activities that determined the individual and group baseline behaviors into which experimental operations were introduced and withdrawn. A cooperation condition was in effect when all three subjects were required to select simultaneous access to a group area before it became available for use. A noncooperation condition was in effect when access to a group area could be selected by individual subjects, without regard to the other subjects' selections. For all groups, the effects of these two conditions on individual and group behaviors were investigated in reversal designs where several successive days occurred under each condition. Groups 1, 4, and 5 had the noncooperation condition interposed between cooperation conditions. Groups 2 and 3 had the cooperation condition interposed between noncooperation conditions. Durations of triadic activities, per cent of time in triadic activities, intercom use, and intersubject program synchronization were greater during cooperation conditions than during noncooperation conditions. These data show that a cooperation contingency within the behavioral program affected both social behavior and the collateral individual behavior necessary to execute the cooperation response. 1976 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-302
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the experimental analysis of behavior
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1976

Keywords

  • behavioral program
  • continuously programmed environment
  • cooperation contingency
  • humans
  • social behavior
  • social systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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