The effectiveness of cigarette pack health warning labels with religious messages in an urban setting in Indonesia: A cross-sectional study

Bekir Kaplan, Jeffrey Hardesty, Santi Martini, Hario Megatsari, Ryan D. Kennedy, Joanna E. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study sought to assess the effectiveness of religious cigarette health warning labels (HWLs) in Indonesia, a country with a high public health burden from tobacco use. The study tested different religious and nonreligious messages related to suicide, secondhand smoke (SHS) and gangrene. Participants were smokers and non-smokers from Surabaya, Indonesia (n = 817). Participants rated each HWL for its effectiveness on a scale of 1 to 10 (1 = “not at all”, 10 = “extremely”) with respect to 10 items. Nonreligious HWLs were marginally superior for SHS and suicide while religious HWLs were marginally superior for gangrene. Given the close rating scores between religious and nonreligious HWLs, they were functionally equal in effectiveness. With proper assessment of potential unintended consequences, the implementation of religious HWLs could be considered for a proportion of HWLs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4287
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume16
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2019

Fingerprint

Indonesia
Tobacco Products
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Gangrene
Suicide
Tobacco Use
Public Health

Keywords

  • Indonesia
  • Spiritual messages
  • Tobacco control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

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title = "The effectiveness of cigarette pack health warning labels with religious messages in an urban setting in Indonesia: A cross-sectional study",
abstract = "This study sought to assess the effectiveness of religious cigarette health warning labels (HWLs) in Indonesia, a country with a high public health burden from tobacco use. The study tested different religious and nonreligious messages related to suicide, secondhand smoke (SHS) and gangrene. Participants were smokers and non-smokers from Surabaya, Indonesia (n = 817). Participants rated each HWL for its effectiveness on a scale of 1 to 10 (1 = “not at all”, 10 = “extremely”) with respect to 10 items. Nonreligious HWLs were marginally superior for SHS and suicide while religious HWLs were marginally superior for gangrene. Given the close rating scores between religious and nonreligious HWLs, they were functionally equal in effectiveness. With proper assessment of potential unintended consequences, the implementation of religious HWLs could be considered for a proportion of HWLs.",
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