The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates

Bruce H. Newman, Daniel T. Newman, Raffat Ahmad, Arthur J. Roth

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Some blood donation-related adverse events (AEs) can negatively impact the blood donor return rate (BDRR) and decrease donor retention. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: One-thousand randomly selected whole-blood donors were interviewed 3 weeks after a 525-mL index whole-blood donation for seven AEs. The number of return visits and duration of follow-up were recorded for each of the 1000 donors. A negative binomial regression analysis was used to determine the contribution of the four most common AEs to the BDRR, and interactions between these AEs were also evaluated. RESULTS: The four most common AEs were bruise alone (15.1%), sore arm "alone" (7.0%), fatigue "alone" (5.1%), and donor reaction "alone" (4.2%), where "alone" is defined to also include donors who had a bruise but no other AE. The estimated BDRR for donations without AEs was 1.32 visits per year. The estimated BDRRs for the four most common AEs were: bruise alone, 1.32 visits per year; sore arm alone, 1.30 visits per year (2% reduction in BDRR); fatigue alone, 1.06 visits per year (20% reduction in BDRR); and donor reaction alone, 0.87 visits per year (34% reduction in BDRR). The BDRR for donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm together was 0.20 visits per year (85% reduction in BDRR). CONCLUSION: Donor reaction had the most negative impact on the BDRR. There appears to be a synergistic effect between donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm. Theoretically, amelioration of some AEs has the potential to improve BDRRs.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1374-1379
Number of pages6
JournalTransfusion
Volume46
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blood Donors
Tissue Donors
Fatigue
Contusions
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Newman, B. H., Newman, D. T., Ahmad, R., & Roth, A. J. (2006). The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates. Transfusion, 46(8), 1374-1379. DOI: 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2006.00905.x

The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates. / Newman, Bruce H.; Newman, Daniel T.; Ahmad, Raffat; Roth, Arthur J.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 46, No. 8, 08.2006, p. 1374-1379.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Newman, BH, Newman, DT, Ahmad, R & Roth, AJ 2006, 'The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates' Transfusion, vol 46, no. 8, pp. 1374-1379. DOI: 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2006.00905.x
Newman BH, Newman DT, Ahmad R, Roth AJ. The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates. Transfusion. 2006 Aug;46(8):1374-1379. Available from, DOI: 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2006.00905.x
Newman, Bruce H. ; Newman, Daniel T. ; Ahmad, Raffat ; Roth, Arthur J./ The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates. In: Transfusion. 2006 ; Vol. 46, No. 8. pp. 1374-1379
@article{54d701c1e8e847708479a4805e7fec84,
title = "The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Some blood donation-related adverse events (AEs) can negatively impact the blood donor return rate (BDRR) and decrease donor retention. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: One-thousand randomly selected whole-blood donors were interviewed 3 weeks after a 525-mL index whole-blood donation for seven AEs. The number of return visits and duration of follow-up were recorded for each of the 1000 donors. A negative binomial regression analysis was used to determine the contribution of the four most common AEs to the BDRR, and interactions between these AEs were also evaluated. RESULTS: The four most common AEs were bruise alone (15.1%), sore arm {"}alone{"} (7.0%), fatigue {"}alone{"} (5.1%), and donor reaction {"}alone{"} (4.2%), where {"}alone{"} is defined to also include donors who had a bruise but no other AE. The estimated BDRR for donations without AEs was 1.32 visits per year. The estimated BDRRs for the four most common AEs were: bruise alone, 1.32 visits per year; sore arm alone, 1.30 visits per year (2% reduction in BDRR); fatigue alone, 1.06 visits per year (20% reduction in BDRR); and donor reaction alone, 0.87 visits per year (34% reduction in BDRR). The BDRR for donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm together was 0.20 visits per year (85% reduction in BDRR). CONCLUSION: Donor reaction had the most negative impact on the BDRR. There appears to be a synergistic effect between donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm. Theoretically, amelioration of some AEs has the potential to improve BDRRs.",
author = "Newman, {Bruce H.} and Newman, {Daniel T.} and Raffat Ahmad and Roth, {Arthur J.}",
year = "2006",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1111/j.1537-2995.2006.00905.x",
volume = "46",
pages = "1374--1379",
journal = "Transfusion",
issn = "0041-1132",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates

AU - Newman,Bruce H.

AU - Newman,Daniel T.

AU - Ahmad,Raffat

AU - Roth,Arthur J.

PY - 2006/8

Y1 - 2006/8

N2 - BACKGROUND: Some blood donation-related adverse events (AEs) can negatively impact the blood donor return rate (BDRR) and decrease donor retention. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: One-thousand randomly selected whole-blood donors were interviewed 3 weeks after a 525-mL index whole-blood donation for seven AEs. The number of return visits and duration of follow-up were recorded for each of the 1000 donors. A negative binomial regression analysis was used to determine the contribution of the four most common AEs to the BDRR, and interactions between these AEs were also evaluated. RESULTS: The four most common AEs were bruise alone (15.1%), sore arm "alone" (7.0%), fatigue "alone" (5.1%), and donor reaction "alone" (4.2%), where "alone" is defined to also include donors who had a bruise but no other AE. The estimated BDRR for donations without AEs was 1.32 visits per year. The estimated BDRRs for the four most common AEs were: bruise alone, 1.32 visits per year; sore arm alone, 1.30 visits per year (2% reduction in BDRR); fatigue alone, 1.06 visits per year (20% reduction in BDRR); and donor reaction alone, 0.87 visits per year (34% reduction in BDRR). The BDRR for donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm together was 0.20 visits per year (85% reduction in BDRR). CONCLUSION: Donor reaction had the most negative impact on the BDRR. There appears to be a synergistic effect between donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm. Theoretically, amelioration of some AEs has the potential to improve BDRRs.

AB - BACKGROUND: Some blood donation-related adverse events (AEs) can negatively impact the blood donor return rate (BDRR) and decrease donor retention. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: One-thousand randomly selected whole-blood donors were interviewed 3 weeks after a 525-mL index whole-blood donation for seven AEs. The number of return visits and duration of follow-up were recorded for each of the 1000 donors. A negative binomial regression analysis was used to determine the contribution of the four most common AEs to the BDRR, and interactions between these AEs were also evaluated. RESULTS: The four most common AEs were bruise alone (15.1%), sore arm "alone" (7.0%), fatigue "alone" (5.1%), and donor reaction "alone" (4.2%), where "alone" is defined to also include donors who had a bruise but no other AE. The estimated BDRR for donations without AEs was 1.32 visits per year. The estimated BDRRs for the four most common AEs were: bruise alone, 1.32 visits per year; sore arm alone, 1.30 visits per year (2% reduction in BDRR); fatigue alone, 1.06 visits per year (20% reduction in BDRR); and donor reaction alone, 0.87 visits per year (34% reduction in BDRR). The BDRR for donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm together was 0.20 visits per year (85% reduction in BDRR). CONCLUSION: Donor reaction had the most negative impact on the BDRR. There appears to be a synergistic effect between donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm. Theoretically, amelioration of some AEs has the potential to improve BDRRs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33746328656&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33746328656&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2006.00905.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2006.00905.x

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 1374

EP - 1379

JO - Transfusion

T2 - Transfusion

JF - Transfusion

SN - 0041-1132

IS - 8

ER -