The effect of unstable housing on HIV treatment biomarkers

An instrumental variables approach

Omar Galárraga, Aadia Rana, Momotazur Rahman, Mardge Cohen, Adaora A. Adimora, Oluwakemi Sosanya, Susan Holman, Seble Kassaye, Joel Milam, Jennifer Cohen, Elizabeth Golub, Lisa R. Metsch, Mirjam Colette Kempf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Unstable housing, including homelessness, is a public policy concern for all populations, and more critically for people with a serious health condition such as HIV. We measure the effect of unstable housing on HIV treatment biomarkers: viral suppression (viral load < 200 HIV RNA copies per ml) and adequate CD4+ T-cell count (CD4>350 cells per μl). We use panel data (1995–2015) from 3082 participants of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) sites in Bronx and Brooklyn (NY), Chicago (IL), Los Angeles and San Francisco (CA), and Washington (DC). The instrumental variable (IV) measures allocations for the Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) per person newly infected with HIV, and it represents actual availability of housing assistance for HIV-positive persons at the metropolitan area level. Using an extended probit model with the IV, we find that unstable housing reduces the likelihood of viral suppression by 51 percentage points, and decreases the probability of having adequate CD4 cell count by 53 percentage points. The endogeneity-corrected results are larger than naïve probits, which show decreases of 8.1 and 7.8 percentage points, respectively. The hypothesized pathways for the effect are: decreased use of mental healthcare/counseling, any healthcare, and less continuity of care. Increasing efforts to improve housing assistance, including HOPWA, and other interventions to make housing more affordable for low-income populations, and HIV-positive populations in particular, may be warranted not only for the benefits of stable housing, but also to improve HIV-related biomarkers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-82
Number of pages13
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume214
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Biomarkers
housing
HIV
Therapeutics
suppression
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
assistance
Delivery of Health Care
Instrumental Variables
AIDS/HIV
Homeless Persons
Continuity of Patient Care
San Francisco
human being
Los Angeles
homelessness
Poverty
Public Policy
CD4 Lymphocyte Count

Keywords

  • CD4 cell count
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Housing assistance
  • Instrumental variables
  • Unstable housing
  • Viral suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Galárraga, O., Rana, A., Rahman, M., Cohen, M., Adimora, A. A., Sosanya, O., ... Kempf, M. C. (2018). The effect of unstable housing on HIV treatment biomarkers: An instrumental variables approach. Social Science and Medicine, 214, 70-82. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.07.051

The effect of unstable housing on HIV treatment biomarkers : An instrumental variables approach. / Galárraga, Omar; Rana, Aadia; Rahman, Momotazur; Cohen, Mardge; Adimora, Adaora A.; Sosanya, Oluwakemi; Holman, Susan; Kassaye, Seble; Milam, Joel; Cohen, Jennifer; Golub, Elizabeth; Metsch, Lisa R.; Kempf, Mirjam Colette.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 214, 01.10.2018, p. 70-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galárraga, O, Rana, A, Rahman, M, Cohen, M, Adimora, AA, Sosanya, O, Holman, S, Kassaye, S, Milam, J, Cohen, J, Golub, E, Metsch, LR & Kempf, MC 2018, 'The effect of unstable housing on HIV treatment biomarkers: An instrumental variables approach', Social Science and Medicine, vol. 214, pp. 70-82. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.07.051
Galárraga, Omar ; Rana, Aadia ; Rahman, Momotazur ; Cohen, Mardge ; Adimora, Adaora A. ; Sosanya, Oluwakemi ; Holman, Susan ; Kassaye, Seble ; Milam, Joel ; Cohen, Jennifer ; Golub, Elizabeth ; Metsch, Lisa R. ; Kempf, Mirjam Colette. / The effect of unstable housing on HIV treatment biomarkers : An instrumental variables approach. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 214. pp. 70-82.
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