The effect of the night float rotation on annual in-training examination performance

Rita Wesley Driggers, Rebecca J. Chason, Cara Olsen, Christopher M. Zahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess whether night-float rotation affected resident performance on the Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) inservice examination. STUDY DESIGN: Review of annual CREOG in-service examination scores standardized for postgraduate year level (2001-2009) compared scores for residents on night float rotation at time of examination to those on non-night float rotation. Data were analyzed by linear mixed effects model. RESULTS: Data were obtained for 72 residents, 20 of whom were on night float at time of at least one examination. One to four test scores were available for each resident (total 225 test scores). Average test score was 213 (SD=20). The mean score for residents on night float was 214 (95% CI 207-221); the mean score for those on non-night float rotations was 212 (95% CI 208-216, p=0.53). Sample size was sufficient to detect a difference of 12 points with 80% power. CONCLUSION: Although night float rotations necessitate a complete reversal in sleep schedules, we found that night float service did not significantly affect scores on the annual in-service examination. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the impact of this schedule on testtaking ability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-361
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Volume55
Issue number7-8
StatePublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Gynecology
Obstetrics
Appointments and Schedules
Education
Aptitude
Sample Size
Sleep
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • In-service examination
  • Night float rotation
  • Residents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

The effect of the night float rotation on annual in-training examination performance. / Driggers, Rita Wesley; Chason, Rebecca J.; Olsen, Cara; Zahn, Christopher M.

In: Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Vol. 55, No. 7-8, 07.2010, p. 357-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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