The effect of physician training on treatment of respiratory infections: evidence from rural Egypt.

R. Langsten, K. Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A three-round survey of child mortality, morbidity and treatment conducted in rural lower Egypt in 1990-91 found relatively poor treatment practices for respiratory infections. Only about 56 per cent of children with a respiratory infection received appropriate treatment. Antibiotics were prescribed for more than half of all mild coughs and colds, but were not prescribed for a quarter or more of serious cases. A training program for government physicians conducted midway through the survey improved treatment practice slightly in government facilities. However, training alone is unlikely to improve treatment much. Better supervision, and information campaigns focused directly on mothers, are suggested as necessary components of a successful project.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-182
Number of pages16
JournalHealth transition review : the cultural, social, and behavioural determinants of health
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - Oct 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of physician training on treatment of respiratory infections: evidence from rural Egypt.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this