The effect of parental immigration authorization on health insurance coverage for migrant Latino children

Andrea C. Weathers, Cynthia S. Minkovitz, Marie Diener-West, Patricia O'Campo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine if immigration authorization among parents is associated with health insurance coverage for migrant Latino children. Data Source: A cross-sectional household survey of 300 migrant families for which one child, aged <13 years, was randomly selected. Results: Most children lacked insurance (73%) and had unauthorized parents (77%). Having an authorized parent or parental stay of more than 5 years in the US were each positively associated with children's health insurance coverage [OR: 4.9; 95% CI: (2.7-8.7) and [OR = 6.7; 95% CI: (3.8-12.0), respectively]. The effect of parental authorization did not persist in multivariable logistic regression analysis; however, more than 5 years of parental stay in the US remained associated with children's insurance coverage [OR = 4.8; 95% CI (1.8-12.2)], regardless of parental authorization. Conclusion: Increased parental familiarity with US health and/or social services agencies, rather than parental authorization status, is important to obtaining health insurance for migrant children. Efforts to insure eligible migrant children should focus on recently arrived families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-254
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

Keywords

  • Child health
  • Health insurance
  • Immigrants
  • Latino health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effect of parental immigration authorization on health insurance coverage for migrant Latino children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this