The effect of intimate partner violence education on nurse practitioners' feelings of competence and ability to screen patients

Diane Hinderliter, Andrea S. Doughty, Kathleen Delaney, Carol Rogers Pitula, Jacquelyn Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the prevalence of formal intimate partner violence (IPV) education during basic and advanced practice programs and its effect on the likelihood of screening for IPV. A national, random sample of 553 nurse practitioners completed a written survey documenting their IPV educational experiences in both their basic and advanced practice programs. Although 77.9% had received IPV education at some point in their nursing education, this eduation had a far greater effect on their subjective feelings of competence and comfort in working with IPV patients than it had on the likelihood of their screening or identifying IPV victims in their practice. Nurse educators must provide students with the words, body language, and screening measures to use to screen effectively. Study implications for nursing education, limitations, and recommendations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-454
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nursing Education
Volume42
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

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