The Effect of Intimate Partner Violence and Probable Traumatic Brain Injury on Mental Health Outcomes for Black Women

Andrea Cimino, Grace Yi, Michelle Patch, Yasmin Alter, Jacquelyn C Campbell, Kristin K. Gundersen, Judy T. Tang, Kiyomi Tsuyuki, Jamila K. Stockman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Severe intimate partner violence (IPV) including loss of consciousness from head injuries and/or strangulation can result in traumatic brain injury (TBI), a brain pathology characterized by altered brain function, cognitive impairment, and mental health disorders, including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study examines the prevalence of probable TBI (defined as loss of consciousness from a blow to the head and/or strangulation) and its association with comorbid PTSD and depression among Black women, who experience both higher rates of IPV and greater mental health burden than White and Latina women. Data come from a retrospective cohort study of 95 Black women with abuse history including IPV, forced sex, and childhood maltreatment. About one-third of women (n = 32) had probable TBI. Among them, 38% (n = 12) were hit on the head, 38% (n = 12) were strangled to unconsciousness, and 25% (n = 8) were strangled and hit on the head. Women with IPV history and probable TBI had significantly greater odds of various physical injuries including those that required medical care compared to other abused women. Probable TBI significantly increased comorbid PTSD and depression by 8.93 points (SE = 3.40), after controlling for past violence (F (4, 90) = 3.67, p <.01). Findings from this study reinforce the need to screen women who lost unconsciousness due to IPV for TBI and facilitate referrals to IPV interventions and mental health treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Mental Health
Unconsciousness
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Head
Depression
Battered Women
Brain
Craniocerebral Trauma
Hispanic Americans
Violence
Mental Disorders
Traumatic Brain Injury
Intimate Partner Violence
Cohort Studies
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
History
Pathology
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • depression
  • domestic violence
  • Intimate partner violence
  • physical abuse
  • posttraumatic stress disorder
  • sexual abuse
  • strangulation
  • unconscious

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The Effect of Intimate Partner Violence and Probable Traumatic Brain Injury on Mental Health Outcomes for Black Women. / Cimino, Andrea; Yi, Grace; Patch, Michelle; Alter, Yasmin; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Gundersen, Kristin K.; Tang, Judy T.; Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; Stockman, Jamila K.

In: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cimino, Andrea ; Yi, Grace ; Patch, Michelle ; Alter, Yasmin ; Campbell, Jacquelyn C ; Gundersen, Kristin K. ; Tang, Judy T. ; Tsuyuki, Kiyomi ; Stockman, Jamila K. / The Effect of Intimate Partner Violence and Probable Traumatic Brain Injury on Mental Health Outcomes for Black Women. In: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma. 2019.
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