The effect of interview method on self-reported sexual behavior and perceptions of community norms in Botswana

Philip Anglewicz, Diana Gourvenec, Iris Halldorsdottir, Cate O'Kane, Obakeng Koketso, Marelize Gorgens, Toby Kasper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Since self-reports of sensitive behaviors play an important role in HIV/AIDS research, the accuracy of these measures has often been examined. In this paper we (1) examine the effect of three survey interview methods on self-reported sexual behavior and perceptions of community sexual norms in Botswana, and (2) introduce an interview method to research on self-reported sexual behavior in sub-Saharan Africa. Comparing across these three survey methods (face-to-face, ballot box, and randomized response), we find that ballot box and randomized response surveys both provide higher reports of sensitive behaviors; the results for randomized response are particularly strong. Within these overall patterns, however, there is variation by question type; additionally the effect of interview method differs by sex. We also examine interviewer effects to gain insight into the effectiveness of these interview methods, and our results suggest that caution be used when interpreting the differences between survey methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)674-687
Number of pages14
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple concurrent partnerships
  • Reporting biases
  • Sexual behavior
  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Survey methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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