The effect of hyperhydration on physiological and perceived strain during treadmill exercise in personal protective equipment

David Hostler, Michael Gallagher, Fredric L. Goss, Jennifer R. Seitz, Steven E. Reis, Robert J. Robertson, William E. Northington, Joe Suyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Work in personal protective equipment (PPE) impairs thermoregulation causing cardiovascular stress, increased core body temperature, and hypohydration. We examined the effect of pretreating first responders performing treadmill exercise in PPE with an infusion of normal saline on physiological and perceptual strain. Ten (eight males, two females) euhydrated subjects performed treadmill exercise on two occasions wearing a chemical resistant coverall, air purifying respirator, butyl gloves, and heavy boots. During the hyperhydration session, normal saline was rapidly infused through an arm vein prior to donning PPE. Exercise duration and maximum core temperature did not differ between euhydrated and hyperhydrated conditions. Perceptual strain index (PeSI) was higher than physiological strain index (PhSI) in the euhydrated condition (P = 0.002) but neither index differed between the control and experimental conditions. Intravenous hyperhydration did not reduce physiological stress, increase exercise, or influence perceptual strain time when compared to the euhydrated condition in moderately fit individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)607-613
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume105
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Keywords

  • Hydration
  • Perceptual strain
  • Personal protective equipment
  • Physiologic strain
  • Thermoregulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology (medical)

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