The effect of hepatitis C on progression to AIDS before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy

Maria Dorrucci, Catia Valdarchi, Barbara Suligoi, Mauro Zaccarelli, Alessandro Sinicco, Massimo Giuliani, David Vlahov, Patrizio Pezzotti, Giovanni Rezza

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Objectives: To assess the effect of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) on the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, before and after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods: We used data from a multi-centre prospective study of HIV seroconverters. Survival analyses were performed to compare the progression to AIDS by HCV serostatus in the period before HAART (i.e. June 1991-May 1996) and in the HAART era (i.e. June 1996-June 2001), controlling for duration of HIV infection. Results: Among the 1052 persons enrolled, 595 (56.6%) were co-infected; the median follow-up time was 9.7 years. Adjusting for demographic variables (age at HIV seroconversion and gender), HCV infection had no effect on the progression to AIDS in the pre-HAART era [relative hazard (RH) = 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.63-1.11], whereas it increased the risk in the HAART era (RH = 1.77; 95% CI, 1.15-2.73). In the HAART era, the proportion of person-time spent on HAART out of the total time at risk was significantly lower among co-infected persons (30 versus 40% for non-co-infected persons; P-value = 0.001); no significant difference was found for dual-therapy (29 versus 25%, respectively; P-value = 0.205); a significant difference was found for mono-therapy (15 versus 8%, respectively; P-value <0.001). Conclusions: HCV infection was not a determinant of HIV disease progression in the pre-HAART era, whereas since the introduction of HAART, co-infected individuals seem to have had a faster disease progression. This may in part be explained by differences in person-time spent on different antiretroviral regimens.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)2313-2318
    Number of pages6
    JournalAIDS
    Volume18
    Issue number17
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 19 2004

    Fingerprint

    Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
    Hepatitis C
    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
    Virus Diseases
    Hepacivirus
    HIV
    Disease Progression
    Confidence Intervals
    Survival Analysis
    Demography
    Prospective Studies
    Therapeutics
    Infection

    Keywords

    • HAART
    • HCV
    • Progression to AIDS

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Immunology and Allergy
    • Immunology

    Cite this

    Dorrucci, M., Valdarchi, C., Suligoi, B., Zaccarelli, M., Sinicco, A., Giuliani, M., ... Rezza, G. (2004). The effect of hepatitis C on progression to AIDS before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy. AIDS, 18(17), 2313-2318. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-200411190-00012

    The effect of hepatitis C on progression to AIDS before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy. / Dorrucci, Maria; Valdarchi, Catia; Suligoi, Barbara; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Sinicco, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo; Vlahov, David; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Rezza, Giovanni.

    In: AIDS, Vol. 18, No. 17, 19.11.2004, p. 2313-2318.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Dorrucci, M, Valdarchi, C, Suligoi, B, Zaccarelli, M, Sinicco, A, Giuliani, M, Vlahov, D, Pezzotti, P & Rezza, G 2004, 'The effect of hepatitis C on progression to AIDS before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy', AIDS, vol. 18, no. 17, pp. 2313-2318. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-200411190-00012
    Dorrucci M, Valdarchi C, Suligoi B, Zaccarelli M, Sinicco A, Giuliani M et al. The effect of hepatitis C on progression to AIDS before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy. AIDS. 2004 Nov 19;18(17):2313-2318. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-200411190-00012
    Dorrucci, Maria ; Valdarchi, Catia ; Suligoi, Barbara ; Zaccarelli, Mauro ; Sinicco, Alessandro ; Giuliani, Massimo ; Vlahov, David ; Pezzotti, Patrizio ; Rezza, Giovanni. / The effect of hepatitis C on progression to AIDS before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy. In: AIDS. 2004 ; Vol. 18, No. 17. pp. 2313-2318.
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    abstract = "Objectives: To assess the effect of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) on the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, before and after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods: We used data from a multi-centre prospective study of HIV seroconverters. Survival analyses were performed to compare the progression to AIDS by HCV serostatus in the period before HAART (i.e. June 1991-May 1996) and in the HAART era (i.e. June 1996-June 2001), controlling for duration of HIV infection. Results: Among the 1052 persons enrolled, 595 (56.6{\%}) were co-infected; the median follow-up time was 9.7 years. Adjusting for demographic variables (age at HIV seroconversion and gender), HCV infection had no effect on the progression to AIDS in the pre-HAART era [relative hazard (RH) = 0.84; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 0.63-1.11], whereas it increased the risk in the HAART era (RH = 1.77; 95{\%} CI, 1.15-2.73). In the HAART era, the proportion of person-time spent on HAART out of the total time at risk was significantly lower among co-infected persons (30 versus 40{\%} for non-co-infected persons; P-value = 0.001); no significant difference was found for dual-therapy (29 versus 25{\%}, respectively; P-value = 0.205); a significant difference was found for mono-therapy (15 versus 8{\%}, respectively; P-value <0.001). Conclusions: HCV infection was not a determinant of HIV disease progression in the pre-HAART era, whereas since the introduction of HAART, co-infected individuals seem to have had a faster disease progression. This may in part be explained by differences in person-time spent on different antiretroviral regimens.",
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    AU - Valdarchi, Catia

    AU - Suligoi, Barbara

    AU - Zaccarelli, Mauro

    AU - Sinicco, Alessandro

    AU - Giuliani, Massimo

    AU - Vlahov, David

    AU - Pezzotti, Patrizio

    AU - Rezza, Giovanni

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