The effect of gender preference on contraceptive use and fertility in rural Egypt

Kathryn M. Yount, Ray Langsten, Kenneth Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Data are used from two surveys of currently married women aged 15-44 conducted in 1979-80 and 1990-91 to explore the changing impact of gender preference on modern contraceptive use and on fertility in rural Menoufia, Egypt. The significantly positive effects on contraceptive use of having one or more sons in 1979 remained constant in 1990. Families without living sons had higher odds of having a birth than did families with two or more sons during 1979-80, and these relative odds were even higher in 1990-91 among families with three or more living children. The implications of these findings for subsequent declines in aggregate fertility are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-300
Number of pages11
JournalStudies in family planning
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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