The effect of concentrating periods of physical activity on the risk of injury in organized sports in a pediatric population

David Fecteau, Jocelyn Gravel, Antonio DAngelo, Elise Martin, Devendra Amre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: The trend in pediatric sport organizations is to regroup activities into tournaments. Sports-related injuries in children are a public concern. Objective: To evaluate the association between sport injuries and consolidation of physical activity in children. Design: A case-crossover study. Setting: The emergency department of a tertiary care hospital for approximately 1 year in 2006. Participants: Eligible participants had to be between 8 to 16 years of age, presenting to the emergency department for an acute injury that occurred during a timed organized sport event. Assessment of risk factors: A standardized questionnaire was used to evaluate the number of hours of organized physical activity, which was defined as a supervised exercise leading to competitions. The number of hours of activity was compared between case periods (48 hours and 7 days) and control periods of same length. Main outcome measurements: An injury was defined as any acute problem with organic tissue that occurred during a sport. Results: On average, participants performed 136 minutes of organized sport activity in the 48 hours preceding the injury for a mean difference of 8 ± 18 min. They also performed 356 minutes of organized sports in the 7 days prior the injury. This represented an increase of 40 ± 31 minutes compared to the control periods. Conclusions: More injuries were observed if the athletes had increased the concentration of activity in the 7 days prior. Although small, this difference reflected a minor clinical effect. In our study, we failed to disclose an association for the period of 48 hours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)410-414
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Journal of Sport Medicine
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Sports
Exercise
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Athletic Injuries
Population
Hospital Emergency Service
Tertiary Healthcare
Tertiary Care Centers
Athletes
Cross-Over Studies

Keywords

  • Emergency
  • Injury
  • Pediatric
  • Sports medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The effect of concentrating periods of physical activity on the risk of injury in organized sports in a pediatric population. / Fecteau, David; Gravel, Jocelyn; DAngelo, Antonio; Martin, Elise; Amre, Devendra.

In: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 5, 09.2008, p. 410-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fecteau, David ; Gravel, Jocelyn ; DAngelo, Antonio ; Martin, Elise ; Amre, Devendra. / The effect of concentrating periods of physical activity on the risk of injury in organized sports in a pediatric population. In: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 410-414.
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