The effect of cell cluster size on intracellular nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia: Is it possible to treat microscopic tumors?

Mohammad Hedayati, Owen Thomas, Budri Abubaker-Sharif, Haoming Zhou, Christine Cornejo, Yonggang Zhang, Michele Wabler, Jana Mihalic, Cordula Gruettner, Fritz Westphal, Alison Geyh, Theodore DeWeese, Robert Ivkov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To compare the measured surface temperature of variable size ensembles of cells heated by intracellular magnetic fluid hyperthermia with heat diffusion model predictions. Materials & methods: Starch-coated Bionized NanoFerrite (Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Rostock, Germany) iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles were loaded into cultured DU145 prostate cancer cells. Cell pellets of variable size were treated with alternating magnetic fields. The surface temperature of the pellets was measured in situ and the associated cytotoxicity was determined by clonogenic survival assay. Results & conclusion: For a given intracellular nanoparticle concentration, a critical minimum number of cells was required for cytotoxic hyperthermia. Above this threshold, cytotoxicity increased with increasing cell number. The measured surface temperatures were consistent with those predicted by a heat diffusion model that ignores intercellular thermal barriers. These results suggest a minimum tumor volume threshold of approximately 1 mm3, below which nanoparticle-mediated heating is unlikely to be effective as the sole cytotoxic agent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-41
Number of pages13
JournalNanomedicine
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Cell Size
tumor
Nanoparticles
heat
Tumors
surface temperature
Fever
Hot Temperature
Cytotoxicity
Temperature
heat pump
Cell Count
Intracellular Fluid
Neoplasms
cancer
Magnetic fluids
Cytotoxins
Magnetic Fields
Tumor Burden
Starch

Keywords

  • alternating magnetic field
  • cancer therapy
  • hyperthermia
  • intracellular
  • iron oxide
  • magnetic nanoparticles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Development

Cite this

The effect of cell cluster size on intracellular nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia : Is it possible to treat microscopic tumors? / Hedayati, Mohammad; Thomas, Owen; Abubaker-Sharif, Budri; Zhou, Haoming; Cornejo, Christine; Zhang, Yonggang; Wabler, Michele; Mihalic, Jana; Gruettner, Cordula; Westphal, Fritz; Geyh, Alison; DeWeese, Theodore; Ivkov, Robert.

In: Nanomedicine, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 29-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hedayati, M, Thomas, O, Abubaker-Sharif, B, Zhou, H, Cornejo, C, Zhang, Y, Wabler, M, Mihalic, J, Gruettner, C, Westphal, F, Geyh, A, DeWeese, T & Ivkov, R 2013, 'The effect of cell cluster size on intracellular nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia: Is it possible to treat microscopic tumors?', Nanomedicine, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 29-41. https://doi.org/10.2217/nnm.12.98
Hedayati, Mohammad ; Thomas, Owen ; Abubaker-Sharif, Budri ; Zhou, Haoming ; Cornejo, Christine ; Zhang, Yonggang ; Wabler, Michele ; Mihalic, Jana ; Gruettner, Cordula ; Westphal, Fritz ; Geyh, Alison ; DeWeese, Theodore ; Ivkov, Robert. / The effect of cell cluster size on intracellular nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia : Is it possible to treat microscopic tumors?. In: Nanomedicine. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 29-41.
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