The Effect of Birth Cohort on Well-Being: The Legacy of Economic Hard Times

Angelina R. Sutin, Antonio Terracciano, Yuri Milaneschi, Yang An, Luigi Ferrucci, Alan B. Zonderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the present research, we examined the effects of age, cohort, and time of measurement on well-being across adulthood. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of two independent samples-one with more than 10,000 repeated assessments across 30 years (mean assessments per participant = 4.44, SD = 3.47) and one with nationally representative data-suggested that well-being declines with age. This decline, however, reversed when we controlled for birth cohort. That is, once we accounted for the fact that older cohorts had lower levels of well-being, all cohorts increased in well-being with age relative to their own baseline. Participants tested more recently had higher well-being, but time of measurement, unlike cohort, did not change the shape of the trajectory. Although well-being increased with age for everyone, cohorts that lived through the economic challenges of the early 20th century had lower well-being than those born during more prosperous times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-385
Number of pages7
JournalPsychological Science
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cohort Effect
Economics
Parturition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research

Keywords

  • aging
  • well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Sutin, A. R., Terracciano, A., Milaneschi, Y., An, Y., Ferrucci, L., & Zonderman, A. B. (2013). The Effect of Birth Cohort on Well-Being: The Legacy of Economic Hard Times. Psychological Science, 24(3), 379-385. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797612459658

The Effect of Birth Cohort on Well-Being : The Legacy of Economic Hard Times. / Sutin, Angelina R.; Terracciano, Antonio; Milaneschi, Yuri; An, Yang; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 24, No. 3, 2013, p. 379-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sutin, AR, Terracciano, A, Milaneschi, Y, An, Y, Ferrucci, L & Zonderman, AB 2013, 'The Effect of Birth Cohort on Well-Being: The Legacy of Economic Hard Times', Psychological Science, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 379-385. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797612459658
Sutin AR, Terracciano A, Milaneschi Y, An Y, Ferrucci L, Zonderman AB. The Effect of Birth Cohort on Well-Being: The Legacy of Economic Hard Times. Psychological Science. 2013;24(3):379-385. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797612459658
Sutin, Angelina R. ; Terracciano, Antonio ; Milaneschi, Yuri ; An, Yang ; Ferrucci, Luigi ; Zonderman, Alan B. / The Effect of Birth Cohort on Well-Being : The Legacy of Economic Hard Times. In: Psychological Science. 2013 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 379-385.
@article{2c57933780694d36b04f4e64ea7b3c46,
title = "The Effect of Birth Cohort on Well-Being: The Legacy of Economic Hard Times",
abstract = "In the present research, we examined the effects of age, cohort, and time of measurement on well-being across adulthood. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of two independent samples-one with more than 10,000 repeated assessments across 30 years (mean assessments per participant = 4.44, SD = 3.47) and one with nationally representative data-suggested that well-being declines with age. This decline, however, reversed when we controlled for birth cohort. That is, once we accounted for the fact that older cohorts had lower levels of well-being, all cohorts increased in well-being with age relative to their own baseline. Participants tested more recently had higher well-being, but time of measurement, unlike cohort, did not change the shape of the trajectory. Although well-being increased with age for everyone, cohorts that lived through the economic challenges of the early 20th century had lower well-being than those born during more prosperous times.",
keywords = "aging, well-being",
author = "Sutin, {Angelina R.} and Antonio Terracciano and Yuri Milaneschi and Yang An and Luigi Ferrucci and Zonderman, {Alan B.}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1177/0956797612459658",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "379--385",
journal = "Psychological Science",
issn = "0956-7976",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of Birth Cohort on Well-Being

T2 - The Legacy of Economic Hard Times

AU - Sutin, Angelina R.

AU - Terracciano, Antonio

AU - Milaneschi, Yuri

AU - An, Yang

AU - Ferrucci, Luigi

AU - Zonderman, Alan B.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - In the present research, we examined the effects of age, cohort, and time of measurement on well-being across adulthood. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of two independent samples-one with more than 10,000 repeated assessments across 30 years (mean assessments per participant = 4.44, SD = 3.47) and one with nationally representative data-suggested that well-being declines with age. This decline, however, reversed when we controlled for birth cohort. That is, once we accounted for the fact that older cohorts had lower levels of well-being, all cohorts increased in well-being with age relative to their own baseline. Participants tested more recently had higher well-being, but time of measurement, unlike cohort, did not change the shape of the trajectory. Although well-being increased with age for everyone, cohorts that lived through the economic challenges of the early 20th century had lower well-being than those born during more prosperous times.

AB - In the present research, we examined the effects of age, cohort, and time of measurement on well-being across adulthood. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of two independent samples-one with more than 10,000 repeated assessments across 30 years (mean assessments per participant = 4.44, SD = 3.47) and one with nationally representative data-suggested that well-being declines with age. This decline, however, reversed when we controlled for birth cohort. That is, once we accounted for the fact that older cohorts had lower levels of well-being, all cohorts increased in well-being with age relative to their own baseline. Participants tested more recently had higher well-being, but time of measurement, unlike cohort, did not change the shape of the trajectory. Although well-being increased with age for everyone, cohorts that lived through the economic challenges of the early 20th century had lower well-being than those born during more prosperous times.

KW - aging

KW - well-being

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875029246&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875029246&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0956797612459658

DO - 10.1177/0956797612459658

M3 - Article

C2 - 23349030

AN - SCOPUS:84875029246

VL - 24

SP - 379

EP - 385

JO - Psychological Science

JF - Psychological Science

SN - 0956-7976

IS - 3

ER -