The effect of bedside case presentations on patients' perceptions of their medical care

L. S. Lehmann, F. L. Brancati, M. C. Chen, Debra Roter, Adrian S Dobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Concern that case presentations at the bedside may make patients uncomfortable has led many residency programs to move presentations to the conference room. We performed a randomized, controlled trial of the effect of these two approaches on patients' perceptions of their care. Methods: The study patients were adults admitted to the general medical service of a teaching hospital. Four house-staff 'firms' (each comprising teams of physicians) were randomly assigned to make their case presentations during morning rounds either at the patient's bedside or in a conference room for one week, to switch to the alternate site for a second week, and to return to the initial site for a third week. To assess patients' perceptions, a questionnaire was administered within 24 hours of admission. Results: During the three weeks of the study, 95 patients had bedside presentations and 87 patients had conference-room presentations. When the former were compared with the latter, the patients with bedside presentations reported that their doctors spent more time with them on morning rounds (10 vs. 6 minutes, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1150-1155
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

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Health care
Teaching
Switches
Teaching Rounds
Internship and Residency
Teaching Hospitals
Randomized Controlled Trials
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Bioengineering

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The effect of bedside case presentations on patients' perceptions of their medical care. / Lehmann, L. S.; Brancati, F. L.; Chen, M. C.; Roter, Debra; Dobs, Adrian S.

In: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 4, 1997, p. 1150-1155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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