The effect of a community-based self-help multimodal behavioral intervention in Korean American seniors with high blood pressure

Kim B. Kim, Hae Ra Han, Boyun Huh, Tam Nguyen, Hochang Lee, Miyong T. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Great strides have been made in improving heart health in the United States during the last 2 decades, yet these strides have not encompassed many ethnic minority populations. There are significant health disparity gaps stemming from both a paucity of valid research and a lack of culturally sensitive interventions. In particular, many Korean Americans with chronic illnesses encounter difficulty navigating the healthcare system because of limited health literacy. METHODS: The effect of a multimodal Self-Help Intervention Program on the Control of High Blood Pressure (HBP) was tested in a community-based clinical trial for Korean American seniors. Of 440 seniors enrolled, 369 completed the study (184 in the intervention group and 185 in the control group; mean age = 70.9 ± 5.3 years). The intervention group received 6 weekly educational sessions on HBP management skill building, including health literacy training, followed by telephone counseling and home blood pressure (BP) monitoring for 12 months. RESULTS: Findings support that the Self-Help Intervention Program on the Control of HBP was effective in controlling BP in this ethnic/linguistic minority population. The BP control rates for the intervention and control groups were 49.5% vs. 43.2% at baseline, 58.5% vs. 42.4% at 6 months, 67.9% vs. 52.5% at 12 months, and 54.3% vs. 53.0% at 18 months. Significant changes were observed over time in some psychobehavioral outcomes, including self-efficacy for BP control, medication adherence behavior, HBP knowledge, and depression. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings suggest that the multimodal Self-Help Intervention Program on the Control of HBP is effective at promoting optimal HBP control for this ethnic/linguistic minority population. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRY: NCT00406614.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1199-1208
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume27
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Asian Americans
Hypertension
Health Literacy
Linguistics
Blood Pressure
Clinical Trials
Population
Control Groups
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Medication Adherence
Health
Self Efficacy
Telephone
Registries
Counseling
Chronic Disease
Depression
Delivery of Health Care
Research

Keywords

  • Behavioral intervention
  • Blood pressure
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Health disparity
  • Health literacy
  • High blood pressure
  • Hypertension
  • Korean Americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

The effect of a community-based self-help multimodal behavioral intervention in Korean American seniors with high blood pressure. / Kim, Kim B.; Han, Hae Ra; Huh, Boyun; Nguyen, Tam; Lee, Hochang; Kim, Miyong T.

In: American Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 27, No. 9, 2014, p. 1199-1208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Kim B. ; Han, Hae Ra ; Huh, Boyun ; Nguyen, Tam ; Lee, Hochang ; Kim, Miyong T. / The effect of a community-based self-help multimodal behavioral intervention in Korean American seniors with high blood pressure. In: American Journal of Hypertension. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 9. pp. 1199-1208.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Great strides have been made in improving heart health in the United States during the last 2 decades, yet these strides have not encompassed many ethnic minority populations. There are significant health disparity gaps stemming from both a paucity of valid research and a lack of culturally sensitive interventions. In particular, many Korean Americans with chronic illnesses encounter difficulty navigating the healthcare system because of limited health literacy. METHODS: The effect of a multimodal Self-Help Intervention Program on the Control of High Blood Pressure (HBP) was tested in a community-based clinical trial for Korean American seniors. Of 440 seniors enrolled, 369 completed the study (184 in the intervention group and 185 in the control group; mean age = 70.9 ± 5.3 years). The intervention group received 6 weekly educational sessions on HBP management skill building, including health literacy training, followed by telephone counseling and home blood pressure (BP) monitoring for 12 months. RESULTS: Findings support that the Self-Help Intervention Program on the Control of HBP was effective in controlling BP in this ethnic/linguistic minority population. The BP control rates for the intervention and control groups were 49.5{\%} vs. 43.2{\%} at baseline, 58.5{\%} vs. 42.4{\%} at 6 months, 67.9{\%} vs. 52.5{\%} at 12 months, and 54.3{\%} vs. 53.0{\%} at 18 months. Significant changes were observed over time in some psychobehavioral outcomes, including self-efficacy for BP control, medication adherence behavior, HBP knowledge, and depression. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings suggest that the multimodal Self-Help Intervention Program on the Control of HBP is effective at promoting optimal HBP control for this ethnic/linguistic minority population. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRY: NCT00406614.",
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AU - Kim, Miyong T.

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