The economic and political determinants of human (including health) rights

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper presents an analysis and critique of the U.S. government's current emphasis on human rights; and (a) its limited focus on only some civil and political components of the original U.N. Declaration of Human Rights, and (b) its disregard for economic and social rights such as the rights to work, fair wages, health, education, and social security. The paper discusses the reasons for that limited focus and argues that, contrary to what is widely presented in the media and academe: (1) civil and political rights are highly restricted in the U.S.; (2) those rights are further restricted in the U.S. when analyzed in their social and economic dimensions; (3) civil and political rights are not independent of but rather intrinsically related to and dependent on the existence of socioeconomic rights; (4) the definition of the nature and extension of human rights in their civil, political, social, and economic dimensions is not universal, but rather depends on the pattern of economic and political power relations particular to each society; and (5) the pattern of power relations in the U.S. society and the western system of power, based on the right to individual property and its concomitant class structure and relations, is incompatible with the full realization of human rights in their economic, social, political and civil dimensions. This paper further indicates that U.S. financial and corporate capital, through its overwhelming influence over the organs of political power in the U.S. and over international bodies and agencies, is primarily responsible for the denial of the human rights of the U.S. population and many populations throughout the world as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-168
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Journal of Health Services
Volume8
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1978

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human rights
Economics
determinants
Health
health
political right
economics
Civil Rights
civil rights
political power
right to work
social rights
economic power
International Agencies
social security
United Nations
Social Security
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
wage
UNO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

The economic and political determinants of human (including health) rights. / Navarro, Vicente.

In: International Journal of Health Services, Vol. 8, No. 1, 1978, p. 145-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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