The distal impact of two first-grade preventive interventions on conduct problems and disorder in early adolescence

Nick Ialongo, Jeanne Poduska, Lisa Werthamer, Sheppard Kellam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this article, we examine the impact of two universal, first-grade preventive interventions on the prevalence of conduct problems and disorder and mental health service need and use in early adolescence. The classroom-centered (CC) intervention was designed to reduce the risk for later conduct problems and disorder by enhancing teachers' behavior management in first grade, whereas the Family - School Partnership (FSP) intervention targeted improvement in parent-teacher communication and parents' child behavior management strategies. At Grade 6, or age 12, CC and FSP intervention children received significantly lower ratings from their teachers for conduct problems than control children. CC and FSP children were also significantly less likely than control children to meet diagnostic criteria for Conduct Disorder and to have been suspended from school in the last year. In addition, the CC intervention was associated with significantly lower rates of child mental health service need and utilization. Overall, the CC intervention appeared to be the more effective of the two in reducing the prevalence of conduct problems and disorder at age 12 and in reducing mental health service need and utilization. Nevertheless, future studies may show that the combination of CC and FSP interventions produces additive or even synergistic effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-160
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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