The differential impact of brooding and reflection on the relationship between perceived stress and suicide ideation

Ashley B. Cole, La Ricka R. Wingate, Raymond P. Tucker, Sarah Rhoades-Kerswill, Victoria M. O'Keefe, David W. Hollingsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated whether brooding and reflection moderated the relationship between perceived stress and suicide ideation. It was hypothesized that brooding, but not reflection, would strengthen the effect of perceived stress on suicide ideation above and beyond depression symptoms. Hypotheses were supported. Results suggest the assessment of a brooding response style may help identify clients who are more likely to contemplate suicide when confronted with life stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-173
Number of pages4
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume83
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brooding
  • Perceived stress
  • Reflection
  • Rumination
  • Suicide
  • Suicide ideation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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