The dietary fructose: Vitamin C intake ratio is associated with hyperuricemia in african-american adults

Zihe Zheng, Jane L. Harman, Josef Coresh, Anna Köttgen, Mara Ann McAdams Demarco, Adolfo Correa, Bessie A. Young, Ronit Katz, Casey Rebholz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A high fructose intake has been shown to be associated with increased serum urate concentration, whereas ascorbate (vitamin C) may lower serum urate by competing with urate for renal reabsorption. Objective:We assessed the combined association, as the fructose:vitamin C intake ratio, and the separate associations of dietary fructose and vitamin C intakes on prevalent hyperuricemia. Methods:We conducted cross-sectional analyses of dietary intakes of fructose and vitamin C and serum urate concentrations among Jackson Heart Study participants, a cohort of African Americans in Jackson, Mississippi, aged 21-91 y. In the analytic sample (n = 4576), multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the separate associations of dietary intakes of fructose and vitamin C and the fructose:vitamin C intake ratio with prevalent hyperuricemia (serum urate >7 mg/dL), after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, diuretic medication use, vitamin C supplement use, total energy intake, alcohol consumption, and dietary intake of animal protein. Analyses for individual dietary factors (vitamin C, fructose) were adjusted for the other dietary factor. Results: In the fully adjusted model, there were 17% greater odds of hyperuricemia associated with a doubling of the fructose:vitamin C intake ratio (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.28), 20% greater odds associated with a doubling of fructose intake (OR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.34), and 13%lower odds associated with a doubling of vitamin C intake (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.97). Dietary fructose and the fructose:vitamin C intake ratiowere more strongly associated with hyperuricemia among men than women (P-interaction ≤ 0.04). Conclusion: Dietary intakes of fructose and vitamin C are associated with prevalent hyperuricemia in a community-based population of African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-426
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume148
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Hyperuricemia
Fructose
African Americans
Ascorbic Acid
Uric Acid
Serum
Blood Pressure
Mississippi
Waist Circumference
Energy Intake
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Diuretics
Alcohol Drinking
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Smoking

Keywords

  • Dietary intake
  • Fructose
  • Hyperuricemia
  • Urate
  • Vitamin C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The dietary fructose : Vitamin C intake ratio is associated with hyperuricemia in african-american adults. / Zheng, Zihe; Harman, Jane L.; Coresh, Josef; Köttgen, Anna; McAdams Demarco, Mara Ann; Correa, Adolfo; Young, Bessie A.; Katz, Ronit; Rebholz, Casey.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 148, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 419-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zheng, Zihe ; Harman, Jane L. ; Coresh, Josef ; Köttgen, Anna ; McAdams Demarco, Mara Ann ; Correa, Adolfo ; Young, Bessie A. ; Katz, Ronit ; Rebholz, Casey. / The dietary fructose : Vitamin C intake ratio is associated with hyperuricemia in african-american adults. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2018 ; Vol. 148, No. 3. pp. 419-426.
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AU - Coresh, Josef

AU - Köttgen, Anna

AU - McAdams Demarco, Mara Ann

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