The development of metasuggestibility in children

Kamala London, Maggie Bruck, Debra Ann Poole, Laura Melnyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

One component of metasuggestibility is the understanding that a person's statements can influence another person's reports. The purpose of the present study was to examine the development of this understanding in school-aged children. We produced a short video in which a boy makes a false allegation about being hit following an adult's suggestive interview. Children aged 6-13 years (N = 196) watched the video and answered open-ended and forced-choice questions about why the boy made a false allegation. The 6- and 7-year-olds performed poorly on all question types, whereas the 12- and 13-year-olds were at ceiling. There were developmental increases in metasuggestibility between 8 and 11 years. Our findings indicate that metasuggestibility undergoes prolonged development well into the school years. Implications for child witness training programs are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-155
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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Deception
Interviews
Education
Person
Boys
School Year
Witness
School children
Question Types

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

The development of metasuggestibility in children. / London, Kamala; Bruck, Maggie; Poole, Debra Ann; Melnyk, Laura.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 146-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

London, Kamala ; Bruck, Maggie ; Poole, Debra Ann ; Melnyk, Laura. / The development of metasuggestibility in children. In: Applied Cognitive Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 146-155.
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