The defective nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic ran gradient and inhibits nuclear localization of Ubc9

Joshua B. Kelley, Sutirtha Datta, Chelsi J. Snow, Mandovi Chatterjee, Li Ni, Adam Spencer, Chun Song Yang, Caelin Cubeñas-Potts, Michael J. Matunis, Bryce M. Paschal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3378-3395
Number of pages18
JournalMolecular and cellular biology
Volume31
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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