The declining risk of post-transfusion hepatitis C virus infection

James G. Donahue, Alvaro Munoz, Paul Michael Ness, Donald E. Brown, David H. Yawn, Hugh A. Mcallister, Bruce A. Reitz, Kenrad Edwin Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. The most common serious complication of blood transfusion is post-transfusion hepatitis from the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Blood banks now screen blood donors for surrogate markers of non-A, non-B hepatitis and antibodies to HCV, but the current risk of post-transfusion hepatitis C is unknown. Methods. From 1985 through 1991, blood samples and medical information were obtained prospectively from patients before and at least six months after cardiac surgery. The stored serum samples were tested for antibodies to HCV by enzyme immunoassay, and by recombinant immunoblotting if positive. Results. Of the 912 patients who received transfusions before donors were screened for surrogate markers, 35 seroconverted to HCV, for a risk of 3.84 percent per patient (0.45 percent per unit transfused). For the 976 patients who received transfusions after October 1986 with blood screened for surrogate markers, the risk of seroconversion was 1.54 percent per patient (0.19 percent per unit). For the 522 patients receiving transfusions since the addition in May 1990 of screening for antibodies to HCV, the risk was 0.57 percent per patient (0.03 percent per unit). The trend toward decreasing risk with increasingly stringent screening of donors was statistically significant (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-373
Number of pages5
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume327
Issue number6
StatePublished - Aug 6 1992

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Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Biomarkers
Hepatitis Antibodies
Donor Selection
Blood Banks
Hepatitis C
Blood Donors
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Immunoblotting
Blood Transfusion
Hepatitis
Thoracic Surgery
Tissue Donors
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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The declining risk of post-transfusion hepatitis C virus infection. / Donahue, James G.; Munoz, Alvaro; Ness, Paul Michael; Brown, Donald E.; Yawn, David H.; Mcallister, Hugh A.; Reitz, Bruce A.; Nelson, Kenrad Edwin.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 327, No. 6, 06.08.1992, p. 369-373.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Donahue, JG, Munoz, A, Ness, PM, Brown, DE, Yawn, DH, Mcallister, HA, Reitz, BA & Nelson, KE 1992, 'The declining risk of post-transfusion hepatitis C virus infection', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 327, no. 6, pp. 369-373.
Donahue JG, Munoz A, Ness PM, Brown DE, Yawn DH, Mcallister HA et al. The declining risk of post-transfusion hepatitis C virus infection. New England Journal of Medicine. 1992 Aug 6;327(6):369-373.
Donahue, James G. ; Munoz, Alvaro ; Ness, Paul Michael ; Brown, Donald E. ; Yawn, David H. ; Mcallister, Hugh A. ; Reitz, Bruce A. ; Nelson, Kenrad Edwin. / The declining risk of post-transfusion hepatitis C virus infection. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1992 ; Vol. 327, No. 6. pp. 369-373.
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