The Danish PET/depression project

Clinical symptoms and cerebral blood flow. A regions-of-interest analysis

P. Videbech, B. Ravnkilde, T. H. Pedersen, H. Hartvig, A. Egander, K. Clemmensen, N. A. Rasmussen, F. Andersen, A. Gjedde, R. Rosenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We wanted to explore associations between clinical symptoms of depression and the blood flow to specific regions of the brain. Furthermore, we wanted to compare the regions-of-interest (ROI) method with the functions-of-interest (FOI) approach. Method: The resting blood flow to 42 ROI in the brain was obtained with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in 42 representative in-patients with major depression and 47 matched healthy controls. Results: The patients had increased blood flow to hippocampus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate gyrus, and the basal ganglia. A strong negative correlation was found between the degree of psychomotor retardation of the patients and the blood flow to the dorsolateral and supraorbital prefrontal cortices. The total Hamilton score was correlated with the blood flow to the hippocampus. Conclusion: Our findings support the notion that depressed patients have disturbances in the loops connecting the frontal lobes, limbic system, basal ganglia, and cerebellum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-44
Number of pages10
JournalActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Positron-Emission Tomography
Basal Ganglia
Cerebellum
Hippocampus
Patient Advocacy
Limbic System
Gyrus Cinguli
Brain
Frontal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Depressive disorder
  • Hippocampus
  • Limbic system
  • Psychopathology
  • Tomography, emission-computed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Videbech, P., Ravnkilde, B., Pedersen, T. H., Hartvig, H., Egander, A., Clemmensen, K., ... Rosenberg, R. (2002). The Danish PET/depression project: Clinical symptoms and cerebral blood flow. A regions-of-interest analysis. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 106(1), 35-44. https://doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0447.2002.02245.x

The Danish PET/depression project : Clinical symptoms and cerebral blood flow. A regions-of-interest analysis. / Videbech, P.; Ravnkilde, B.; Pedersen, T. H.; Hartvig, H.; Egander, A.; Clemmensen, K.; Rasmussen, N. A.; Andersen, F.; Gjedde, A.; Rosenberg, R.

In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Vol. 106, No. 1, 2002, p. 35-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Videbech, P, Ravnkilde, B, Pedersen, TH, Hartvig, H, Egander, A, Clemmensen, K, Rasmussen, NA, Andersen, F, Gjedde, A & Rosenberg, R 2002, 'The Danish PET/depression project: Clinical symptoms and cerebral blood flow. A regions-of-interest analysis', Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, vol. 106, no. 1, pp. 35-44. https://doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0447.2002.02245.x
Videbech, P. ; Ravnkilde, B. ; Pedersen, T. H. ; Hartvig, H. ; Egander, A. ; Clemmensen, K. ; Rasmussen, N. A. ; Andersen, F. ; Gjedde, A. ; Rosenberg, R. / The Danish PET/depression project : Clinical symptoms and cerebral blood flow. A regions-of-interest analysis. In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 2002 ; Vol. 106, No. 1. pp. 35-44.
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