The CXC chemokine murine monokine induced by IFN-γ (CXC chemokine ligand 9) is made by APCs, targets lymphocytes including activated B cells, and supports antibody responses to a bacterial pathogen in vivo

Matthew K. Park, Doron Amichay, Paul Love, Elizabeth Wick, Fang Liao, Alex Grinberg, Ronald L. Rabin, Hongwei H. Zhang, Senkuta Gebeyehu, Timothy M. Wright, Akiko Iwasaki, Youmin Weng, Julie A. DeMartino, Karen L. Elkins, Joshua M. Farber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig; CXC chemokine ligand 9) is an IFN-γ-inducible CXC chemokine that signals through the receptor CXCR3 and is known to function as a chemotactic factor for human T cells, particularly following T cell activation. The mig gene can be induced in multiple cell types and organs, and Mig has been shown to contribute to T cell infiltration into immune/inflammatory reactions in peripheral tissues in mice. We have investigated the expression and activities of Mig and CXCR3 in mouse cells and the role of Mig in models of host defense in mice. Murine (Mu)Mig functioned as a chemotactic factor for resting memory and activated T cells, both CD4+ and CD8+, and responsiveness to MuMig correlated with surface expression of MuCXCR3. Using mig-/- mice, we found that MuMig was not necessary for survival after infections with a number of intracellular pathogens. Surprisingly, however, we found that mig-/- mice showed reductions of 50-75% in Abs produced against the intracellular hacterium Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain. Furthermore, we found that MuMig induced both calcium signals and chemotaxis in activated B cells, and that B cell activation induced expression of MuCXCR3. In addition, IFN-γ induced the expression of mumig in APCs, including CD8α+ and CD8α- dendritic cells. Together, our data suggest that Mig and CXCR3 may be important not only to recruit T cells to peripheral inflammatory sites, but also in some cases to maximize interactions among activated T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells within lymphoid organs to provide optimal humoral responses to pathogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1433-1443
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume169
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Monokines
CXC Chemokines
Antibody Formation
B-Lymphocytes
Lymphocytes
Ligands
T-Lymphocytes
Chemotactic Factors
Dendritic Cells
CXCR3 Receptors
Francisella tularensis
Chemotaxis
Vaccines
Calcium
Survival
Mouse Cxcl9 protein
Infection
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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The CXC chemokine murine monokine induced by IFN-γ (CXC chemokine ligand 9) is made by APCs, targets lymphocytes including activated B cells, and supports antibody responses to a bacterial pathogen in vivo. / Park, Matthew K.; Amichay, Doron; Love, Paul; Wick, Elizabeth; Liao, Fang; Grinberg, Alex; Rabin, Ronald L.; Zhang, Hongwei H.; Gebeyehu, Senkuta; Wright, Timothy M.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Weng, Youmin; DeMartino, Julie A.; Elkins, Karen L.; Farber, Joshua M.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 169, No. 3, 01.08.2002, p. 1433-1443.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Park, MK, Amichay, D, Love, P, Wick, E, Liao, F, Grinberg, A, Rabin, RL, Zhang, HH, Gebeyehu, S, Wright, TM, Iwasaki, A, Weng, Y, DeMartino, JA, Elkins, KL & Farber, JM 2002, 'The CXC chemokine murine monokine induced by IFN-γ (CXC chemokine ligand 9) is made by APCs, targets lymphocytes including activated B cells, and supports antibody responses to a bacterial pathogen in vivo', Journal of Immunology, vol. 169, no. 3, pp. 1433-1443.
Park, Matthew K. ; Amichay, Doron ; Love, Paul ; Wick, Elizabeth ; Liao, Fang ; Grinberg, Alex ; Rabin, Ronald L. ; Zhang, Hongwei H. ; Gebeyehu, Senkuta ; Wright, Timothy M. ; Iwasaki, Akiko ; Weng, Youmin ; DeMartino, Julie A. ; Elkins, Karen L. ; Farber, Joshua M. / The CXC chemokine murine monokine induced by IFN-γ (CXC chemokine ligand 9) is made by APCs, targets lymphocytes including activated B cells, and supports antibody responses to a bacterial pathogen in vivo. In: Journal of Immunology. 2002 ; Vol. 169, No. 3. pp. 1433-1443.
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abstract = "Monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig; CXC chemokine ligand 9) is an IFN-γ-inducible CXC chemokine that signals through the receptor CXCR3 and is known to function as a chemotactic factor for human T cells, particularly following T cell activation. The mig gene can be induced in multiple cell types and organs, and Mig has been shown to contribute to T cell infiltration into immune/inflammatory reactions in peripheral tissues in mice. We have investigated the expression and activities of Mig and CXCR3 in mouse cells and the role of Mig in models of host defense in mice. Murine (Mu)Mig functioned as a chemotactic factor for resting memory and activated T cells, both CD4+ and CD8+, and responsiveness to MuMig correlated with surface expression of MuCXCR3. Using mig-/- mice, we found that MuMig was not necessary for survival after infections with a number of intracellular pathogens. Surprisingly, however, we found that mig-/- mice showed reductions of 50-75{\%} in Abs produced against the intracellular hacterium Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain. Furthermore, we found that MuMig induced both calcium signals and chemotaxis in activated B cells, and that B cell activation induced expression of MuCXCR3. In addition, IFN-γ induced the expression of mumig in APCs, including CD8α+ and CD8α- dendritic cells. Together, our data suggest that Mig and CXCR3 may be important not only to recruit T cells to peripheral inflammatory sites, but also in some cases to maximize interactions among activated T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells within lymphoid organs to provide optimal humoral responses to pathogens.",
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T1 - The CXC chemokine murine monokine induced by IFN-γ (CXC chemokine ligand 9) is made by APCs, targets lymphocytes including activated B cells, and supports antibody responses to a bacterial pathogen in vivo

AU - Park, Matthew K.

AU - Amichay, Doron

AU - Love, Paul

AU - Wick, Elizabeth

AU - Liao, Fang

AU - Grinberg, Alex

AU - Rabin, Ronald L.

AU - Zhang, Hongwei H.

AU - Gebeyehu, Senkuta

AU - Wright, Timothy M.

AU - Iwasaki, Akiko

AU - Weng, Youmin

AU - DeMartino, Julie A.

AU - Elkins, Karen L.

AU - Farber, Joshua M.

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N2 - Monokine induced by IFN-γ (Mig; CXC chemokine ligand 9) is an IFN-γ-inducible CXC chemokine that signals through the receptor CXCR3 and is known to function as a chemotactic factor for human T cells, particularly following T cell activation. The mig gene can be induced in multiple cell types and organs, and Mig has been shown to contribute to T cell infiltration into immune/inflammatory reactions in peripheral tissues in mice. We have investigated the expression and activities of Mig and CXCR3 in mouse cells and the role of Mig in models of host defense in mice. Murine (Mu)Mig functioned as a chemotactic factor for resting memory and activated T cells, both CD4+ and CD8+, and responsiveness to MuMig correlated with surface expression of MuCXCR3. Using mig-/- mice, we found that MuMig was not necessary for survival after infections with a number of intracellular pathogens. Surprisingly, however, we found that mig-/- mice showed reductions of 50-75% in Abs produced against the intracellular hacterium Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain. Furthermore, we found that MuMig induced both calcium signals and chemotaxis in activated B cells, and that B cell activation induced expression of MuCXCR3. In addition, IFN-γ induced the expression of mumig in APCs, including CD8α+ and CD8α- dendritic cells. Together, our data suggest that Mig and CXCR3 may be important not only to recruit T cells to peripheral inflammatory sites, but also in some cases to maximize interactions among activated T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells within lymphoid organs to provide optimal humoral responses to pathogens.

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