The cost effectiveness of oral rehydration therapy for U.S. children with acute diarrhea.

M. Ladinsky, H. Lehmann, Mathuram Santosham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Diarrheal disease is a common cause of morbidity among U.S. children under five years of age and exerts a heavy burden on the health care system. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT), a simple, inexpensive treatment modality that can prevent most diarrhea-related complications, is grossly underutilized in the United States. Using a decision-analysis model, this article describes the financial burden of childhood diarrhea in the United States for children under five years of age and discusses the substantial economic benefits of ORT programs. If fully implemented, such programs would save our health care system close to $1 billion annually.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-119
Number of pages7
JournalMedical interface
Volume9
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Fluid Therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diarrhea
Delivery of Health Care
Decision Support Techniques
Economics
Morbidity
Therapeutics

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The cost effectiveness of oral rehydration therapy for U.S. children with acute diarrhea. / Ladinsky, M.; Lehmann, H.; Santosham, Mathuram.

In: Medical interface, Vol. 9, No. 10, 10.1996, p. 113-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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