The Cost-Effectiveness of Adapting and Implementing a Brief Intervention to Target Frequent Alcohol Use Among Persons with HIV in Vietnam

Natalie A. Blackburn, Vivian F. Go, Quynh Bui, Heidi Hutton, Radhika P. Tampi, Teerada Sripaipan, Tran Viet Ha, Carl A. Latkin, Shelley Golden, Carol Golin, Geetanjali Chander, Constantine Frangakis, Nisha Gottfredson, David W. Dowdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Brief interventions to reduce frequent alcohol use among persons with HIV (PWH) are evidence-based, but resource-constrained settings must contend with competition for health resources. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of two intervention arms compared to the standard of care (SOC) in a three-arm randomized control trial targeting frequent alcohol use in PWH through increasing the percent days abstinent from alcohol and viral suppression. We estimated incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained from a modified societal perspective and a 1-year time horizon using a Markov model of health outcomes. The two-session brief intervention (BI), relative to the six-session combined intervention (CoI), was more effective and less costly; the estimated incremental cost-effectiveness of the BI relative to the SOC, was $525 per QALY gained. The BI may be cost-effective for the HIV treatment setting; the health utility gained from viral suppression requires further exploration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Brief intervention
  • Economic evaluation
  • Frequent alcohol use
  • Viral suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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