The contextual influence of coal abandoned mine lands in communities and type 2 diabetes in Pennsylvania

Ann Y. Liu, Frank C. Curriero, Thomas A. Glass, Walter F. Stewart, Brian S. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Coal abandoned mine lands (AMLs), persistent and prevalent across Pennsylvania, offer an instructive evaluation of potential contextual influences of chronic environmental contamination (CEC) on individual health. We evaluated associations between the burden of AMLs, represented by 10 contextual metrics at the community level, and individual-level type 2 diabetes using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a biomarker. Cross-sectional and longitudinal multilevel analyses were conducted with over 28,000 diabetic primary care patients of the Geisinger Clinic. Adjusted models revealed five AML burden measures were associated (p<0.05), and three additional were borderline associated (0.05≤. p≤0.10), with higher and/or change in HbA1c levels. This study provides key empirical evidence of adverse impacts of CEC in communities on an important chronic disease, illustrating the contextual effects of living in long-term degraded landscapes and communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalHealth and Place
Volume22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • Abandoned mine lands
  • Coal
  • Context
  • Diabetes
  • Multilevel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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