The common beliefs surveyiii, the situational selfstatement, and affective state inventory and their relationship to authoritarianism and social dominance orientation

Mark I. Walter, Geoffrey L. Thorpe, Lisle R. Kingery

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The concept of irrational beliefs is central to rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). These beliefs are defined by their absolutist and dogmatic qualities. The terms absolutist and dogmatic are also characteristic of some personality constructs, right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) being foremost among these. A relatively new personality construct, social dominance orientation (SDO) is similar to RWA in that both are excellent predictors of prejudice. As these two constructs are independent of each other, it has been suggested that they have different etiological underpinnings. The present study examined the relationship between the presence of irrational beliefs in people scoring high in RWA and SDO. Results suggest that high RWAs are more likely than high SDOs to endorse irrational beliefs. These findings add to the growing literature examining the relationship between these two personality constructs as well as suggesting possible implications for the use of REBT with clients scoring high on these personality dimensions.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)105-118
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Rational - Emotive and Cognitive - Behavior Therapy
    Volume19
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

    Keywords

    • Common beliefs survey iii
    • Irrational beliefs
    • Right-wing authoritarianism
    • Situational self-statement and affective state inventory
    • Social dominance orientation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
    • Clinical Psychology

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The common beliefs surveyiii, the situational selfstatement, and affective state inventory and their relationship to authoritarianism and social dominance orientation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this