The combination of selenium and vitamin e inhibits type i collagen formation in cultured hepatic stellate cells

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Abstract

This study investigated the effects of sodium selenite (Se) and of vitamin E (d-α-tochopherol) on the deposition of type I collagen by human LX-2 stellate cells. The cultured cells were treated with or without Se or vitamin E and with or without transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). The combination of Se and vitamin E, but not either alone, protected against hepatic fibrosis by decreasing TGFβ1-mediated collagen secretion and accumulation by the stellate cells. This protective effect is due to a combination of decreased formation, decreased stability and increased degradation of the collagen. Effects of Se and vitamin E in decreasing α1(I) collagen mRNA and increasing apoptosis of stellate cells indicate decreased formation of collagen, while decreases in transglutaminase 2, which catalyze cross-linking of collagen, lead to decreased stability of the secreted collagen. Effects of Se and vitamin E on reducing tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) are associated with increased degradation. The combination of Se and vitamin E decreased lipid peroxidation, while Se alone increased the activity of the antioxidant enzyme thioredoxin reductase. In conclusion, the combination of Se and vitamin E protected against TGFβ1-mediated hepatic fibrosis by decreasing TGFβ1-mediated type I collagen accumulation by stellate cells. This effect is due to a combination of decreased formation, decreased stability and increased degradation of the collagen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-94
Number of pages13
JournalBiological Trace Element Research
Volume140
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

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Selenious Acid
Hepatic Stellate Cells
Selenium
Vitamin E
Vitamins
Cultured Cells
Collagen
Transforming Growth Factors
Collagen Type I
Degradation
Fibrosis
Thioredoxin-Disulfide Reductase
Sodium Selenite
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1
Liver
Lipid Peroxidation
Antioxidants
Cells
Apoptosis
Lipids

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Fibrosis
  • Selenium
  • TGFbeta1
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

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abstract = "This study investigated the effects of sodium selenite (Se) and of vitamin E (d-α-tochopherol) on the deposition of type I collagen by human LX-2 stellate cells. The cultured cells were treated with or without Se or vitamin E and with or without transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). The combination of Se and vitamin E, but not either alone, protected against hepatic fibrosis by decreasing TGFβ1-mediated collagen secretion and accumulation by the stellate cells. This protective effect is due to a combination of decreased formation, decreased stability and increased degradation of the collagen. Effects of Se and vitamin E in decreasing α1(I) collagen mRNA and increasing apoptosis of stellate cells indicate decreased formation of collagen, while decreases in transglutaminase 2, which catalyze cross-linking of collagen, lead to decreased stability of the secreted collagen. Effects of Se and vitamin E on reducing tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) are associated with increased degradation. The combination of Se and vitamin E decreased lipid peroxidation, while Se alone increased the activity of the antioxidant enzyme thioredoxin reductase. In conclusion, the combination of Se and vitamin E protected against TGFβ1-mediated hepatic fibrosis by decreasing TGFβ1-mediated type I collagen accumulation by stellate cells. This effect is due to a combination of decreased formation, decreased stability and increased degradation of the collagen.",
keywords = "Apoptosis, Fibrosis, Selenium, TGFbeta1, Vitamin E",
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AU - Liu, Xiaopu

AU - Potter, James John

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N2 - This study investigated the effects of sodium selenite (Se) and of vitamin E (d-α-tochopherol) on the deposition of type I collagen by human LX-2 stellate cells. The cultured cells were treated with or without Se or vitamin E and with or without transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). The combination of Se and vitamin E, but not either alone, protected against hepatic fibrosis by decreasing TGFβ1-mediated collagen secretion and accumulation by the stellate cells. This protective effect is due to a combination of decreased formation, decreased stability and increased degradation of the collagen. Effects of Se and vitamin E in decreasing α1(I) collagen mRNA and increasing apoptosis of stellate cells indicate decreased formation of collagen, while decreases in transglutaminase 2, which catalyze cross-linking of collagen, lead to decreased stability of the secreted collagen. Effects of Se and vitamin E on reducing tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) are associated with increased degradation. The combination of Se and vitamin E decreased lipid peroxidation, while Se alone increased the activity of the antioxidant enzyme thioredoxin reductase. In conclusion, the combination of Se and vitamin E protected against TGFβ1-mediated hepatic fibrosis by decreasing TGFβ1-mediated type I collagen accumulation by stellate cells. This effect is due to a combination of decreased formation, decreased stability and increased degradation of the collagen.

AB - This study investigated the effects of sodium selenite (Se) and of vitamin E (d-α-tochopherol) on the deposition of type I collagen by human LX-2 stellate cells. The cultured cells were treated with or without Se or vitamin E and with or without transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). The combination of Se and vitamin E, but not either alone, protected against hepatic fibrosis by decreasing TGFβ1-mediated collagen secretion and accumulation by the stellate cells. This protective effect is due to a combination of decreased formation, decreased stability and increased degradation of the collagen. Effects of Se and vitamin E in decreasing α1(I) collagen mRNA and increasing apoptosis of stellate cells indicate decreased formation of collagen, while decreases in transglutaminase 2, which catalyze cross-linking of collagen, lead to decreased stability of the secreted collagen. Effects of Se and vitamin E on reducing tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) are associated with increased degradation. The combination of Se and vitamin E decreased lipid peroxidation, while Se alone increased the activity of the antioxidant enzyme thioredoxin reductase. In conclusion, the combination of Se and vitamin E protected against TGFβ1-mediated hepatic fibrosis by decreasing TGFβ1-mediated type I collagen accumulation by stellate cells. This effect is due to a combination of decreased formation, decreased stability and increased degradation of the collagen.

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