The Columbia population study. III. Volunteer status, educational background, and plasma total cholesterol level in a prepaid health care program

G. A. Chase, P. O. Kwiterovich, P. S. Bachorik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

From 1972 through 1975 a study of plasma lipid levels was conducted at the Columbia Medical Plan (a prepaid group practice in an upper-middle-class suburban community) in accordance with nationally standardized interview, blood-drawing and laboratory procedures of the Lipid Research Clinics Program. Data were obtained from a large group of volunteers from the plan as well as from subjects selected by random sampling from membership rolls. Of 2,591 fasting, nonpregnant adults (age ≥ 20 years), 825 were volunteers and 1,766 were randomly selected subjects. Analysis of the plasma total cholesterol values indicated a possible association of volunteer status and higher educational levels with a lower plasma total cholesterol level. Age- and sex-specific comparisons confirmed this finding, although the magnitude of the differences was quite small from the standpoint of clinical risk. The data suggest that even within educational strata, self-selection for cholesterol screening was associated with a lower cholesterol level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-195
Number of pages5
JournalJohns Hopkins Medical Journal
Volume148
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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