The Columbia population study. III. Volunteer status, educational background, and plasma total cholesterol level in a prepaid health care program

G. A. Chase, P. O. Kwiterovich, P. S. Bachorik

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

From 1972 through 1975 a study of plasma lipid levels was conducted at the Columbia Medical Plan (a prepaid group practice in an upper-middle-class suburban community) in accordance with nationally standardized interview, blood-drawing and laboratory procedures of the Lipid Research Clinics Program. Data were obtained from a large group of volunteers from the plan as well as from subjects selected by random sampling from membership rolls. Of 2,591 fasting, nonpregnant adults (age ≥ 20 years), 825 were volunteers and 1,766 were randomly selected subjects. Analysis of the plasma total cholesterol values indicated a possible association of volunteer status and higher educational levels with a lower plasma total cholesterol level. Age- and sex-specific comparisons confirmed this finding, although the magnitude of the differences was quite small from the standpoint of clinical risk. The data suggest that even within educational strata, self-selection for cholesterol screening was associated with a lower cholesterol level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJohns Hopkins Medical Journal
Pages191-195
Number of pages5
Volume148
Edition5
StatePublished - 1981

Fingerprint

Educational Status
Volunteers
Cholesterol
Delivery of Health Care
Population
Prepaid Group Practice
Lipids
Fasting
Interviews
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chase, G. A., Kwiterovich, P. O., & Bachorik, P. S. (1981). The Columbia population study. III. Volunteer status, educational background, and plasma total cholesterol level in a prepaid health care program. In Johns Hopkins Medical Journal (5 ed., Vol. 148, pp. 191-195)

The Columbia population study. III. Volunteer status, educational background, and plasma total cholesterol level in a prepaid health care program. / Chase, G. A.; Kwiterovich, P. O.; Bachorik, P. S.

Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. Vol. 148 5. ed. 1981. p. 191-195.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Chase, GA, Kwiterovich, PO & Bachorik, PS 1981, The Columbia population study. III. Volunteer status, educational background, and plasma total cholesterol level in a prepaid health care program. in Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. 5 edn, vol. 148, pp. 191-195.
Chase GA, Kwiterovich PO, Bachorik PS. The Columbia population study. III. Volunteer status, educational background, and plasma total cholesterol level in a prepaid health care program. In Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. 5 ed. Vol. 148. 1981. p. 191-195
Chase, G. A. ; Kwiterovich, P. O. ; Bachorik, P. S. / The Columbia population study. III. Volunteer status, educational background, and plasma total cholesterol level in a prepaid health care program. Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. Vol. 148 5. ed. 1981. pp. 191-195
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