The color of meth: Is it related to adverse health outcomes? An exploratory study in Tijuana, Mexico

Steffanie A. Strathdee, Patricia Case, Remedios Lozada, Andrea R. Mantsios, Jorge Alvelais, Minya Pu, Kimberly C. Brouwer, Cari L. Miller, Thomas L. Patterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a study of injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico, logistic regression identified factors associated with injection of colored vs. clear methamphetamine in the prior six months (N = 613). Colors injected most often were clear (50%), white (47%), yellow (2%), and pink (1%). IDUs injecting colored meth were more likely to experience recent abscesses (34%) compared to those injecting clear meth (24%; p = 0.008), an association that persisted after adjusting for confounders. Market characteristics, possibly relating to purity or adulterants, may be associated with abscesses among methamphetamine injectors. Further study is needed to confirm and determine the mechanism of this association to better inform prevention messages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-115
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Strathdee, S. A., Case, P., Lozada, R., Mantsios, A. R., Alvelais, J., Pu, M., Brouwer, K. C., Miller, C. L., & Patterson, T. L. (2008). The color of meth: Is it related to adverse health outcomes? An exploratory study in Tijuana, Mexico. American Journal on Addictions, 17(2), 111-115. https://doi.org/10.1080/10550490701862944