The cognitive impenetrability of visual perception: Old wine in a new bottle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pylyshyn's argument is very similar to one made in the 1960s to the effect that vision may be influenced by spatial selective attention being directed to distinctive stimulus features, but not by mental set for meaning or membership in an ill-defined category. More recent work points to a special role for spatial attention in determining tile contents of perception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377
Number of pages1
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume22
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1999

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Visual Perception
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visual perception
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

The cognitive impenetrability of visual perception : Old wine in a new bottle. / Egeth, Howard E.

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 22, No. 3, 1999, p. 377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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