The clinical response to total sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in geriatric depression

potential indicators of antidepressant treatment outcome

Cameron R. Hernandez, Gwenn Smith, Patricia R. Houck, Bruce G. Pollock, Benoit Mulsant, Mary Amanda Dew, Charles F. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The clinical response to antidepressant treatment in late-life depression is often delayed and highly variable. Better indicators of antidepressant efficacy are needed early in the course of treatment, so that augmentation strategies or alternative treatments may be initiated. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether the change in the Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS) after 36 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD) and recovery sleep predicted clinical outcome after 12 weeks of antidepressant treatment, and whether greater predictive value was observed in certain aspects of depressive symptomology. Fifteen elderly patients diagnosed with major depression underwent combined treatment with an initial 36 hours of TSD and a 12-week trial with the antidepressant paroxetine. Six HDRS subscores were evaluated with respect to how the changes after TSD and after one night of recovery sleep correlated with HDRS scores after 12 weeks of treatment. A significant correlation was obtained between the change in the core depressive symptomology subscale from baseline to recovery sleep and the HDRS score at 12 weeks, but the correlation was not significant when evaluating the change from baseline to TSD. These results indicate that the decrease in symptoms after recovery sleep compared with baseline levels (indicating the persistence of the antidepressant response), rather than the symptom reduction after TSD, has greater predictive value with respect to treatment outcome. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-49
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sleep Deprivation
Geriatrics
Antidepressive Agents
Sleep
Depression
Therapeutics
Paroxetine

Keywords

  • Geriatric depression
  • Hamilton depression rating scale
  • Psychopharmacology
  • Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors
  • Sleep deprivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The clinical response to total sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in geriatric depression : potential indicators of antidepressant treatment outcome. / Hernandez, Cameron R.; Smith, Gwenn; Houck, Patricia R.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Mulsant, Benoit; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 97, No. 1, 04.12.2000, p. 41-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hernandez, Cameron R. ; Smith, Gwenn ; Houck, Patricia R. ; Pollock, Bruce G. ; Mulsant, Benoit ; Dew, Mary Amanda ; Reynolds, Charles F. / The clinical response to total sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in geriatric depression : potential indicators of antidepressant treatment outcome. In: Psychiatry Research. 2000 ; Vol. 97, No. 1. pp. 41-49.
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