The clinical relevance of chromosomal and genomic abnormalities in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) occurs at all ages but is the most common cancer of childhood. The current treatment of paediatric ALL is highly successful with up to 90% children being cured. In contrast, survival rates for adult ALL are significantly lower at around 40%. The discovery and characterisation of genetic abnormalities have increased our understanding of the biology of the disease and provided important prognostic and predictive markers which have improved patient outcome. Not only is the spectrum of these aberrations vast but, due to advances in technology, continually expanding. A wide range of chromosomal and genomic abnormalities have been reported as being associated with patient outcome but only a subset are currently used to risk stratify patients. This review highlights the main genetic abnormalities which are used to manage patients with B-cell precursor ALL and discusses the evidence which has been accumulated on several newly described genomic abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-135
Number of pages13
JournalBlood Reviews
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
  • Chromosomal abnormalities
  • Cytogenetics
  • Genomics
  • Prognostication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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