The Clinical Examination and Socially At-Risk Populations: The Examination Matters for Health Disparities

Karly A. Murphy, Alejandra Ellison-Barnes, Erica N. Johnson, Lisa A. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Data from the United States show that persons from low socioeconomic backgrounds, those who are socially isolated, belong to racial or ethnic minority groups, or identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender experience health disparities at a higher rate. Clinicians must transition from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial framework within the clinical examination to better address social determinants of health that contribute to health disparities. We review the characteristics of successful patient–clinician interactions. We describe strategies for relationship-centered care within routine encounters. Our goal is to train clinicians to mitigate differences and reduce disparities in health care delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-532
Number of pages12
JournalMedical Clinics of North America
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Keywords

  • Cultural competency
  • Health care disparities
  • Patient-centered care
  • Shared decision making
  • Social determinants of health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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