The CHL1(CTF1) gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for chromosome transmission and normal cell cycle progression in G2/M

Sandra L. Gerring, Forrest Spencer, Philip Hieter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have analyzed the CTF1 gene, identified in a screen for mutants with decreased chromosome transmission fidelity and shown to correspond to the previously identified chl1 mutation, chl1 null mutants exhibited a 200-fold increase in the rate of chromosome III missegregation per cell division, and near wild-type rates of marker homozygosis on this chromosome by mitotic recombination. Analysis of the segregation of a marker chromosome indicated that sister chromatid loss (1:0 segregation) and sister chromatid non-disjunction (2:0 segregation) contributed equally to chromosome missegregation. A genomic clone of CHL1 was isolated and used to map its physical position on chromosome XVI. Nucleotide sequence analysis of CHL1 revealed a 2.6 kb open reading frame with a 99 kd predicted protein sequence that contained two PEST sequences and was 23% identical to the coding region of a nucleotide excision repair gene, RAD3. Domains of homology between these two predicted protein sequences included a helix-turn-helix motif and an ATP binding site containing a helicase consensus. Mutants lacking the CHL1 gene product are viable and display two striking, and perhaps interrelated, phenotypes: extreme chromosome instability and a delay in cell cycle progression in G2/M. This delay is independent of the cell cycle checkpoint that requires the function of the RAD9 gene.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4347-4358
Number of pages12
JournalThe EMBO journal
Volume9
Issue number13
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Chromosomes
Yeast
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Cell Cycle
Genes
Cells
Chromatids
Helix-Turn-Helix Motifs
Chromosomal Instability
Nucleotides
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Genetic Markers
DNA Repair
Cell Division
Genetic Recombination
Open Reading Frames
Sequence Analysis
Proteins
Clone Cells
Adenosine Triphosphate

Keywords

  • Cell cycle
  • CTF1 gene
  • Mutants
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The CHL1(CTF1) gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for chromosome transmission and normal cell cycle progression in G2/M. / Gerring, Sandra L.; Spencer, Forrest; Hieter, Philip.

In: The EMBO journal, Vol. 9, No. 13, 1990, p. 4347-4358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gerring, Sandra L. ; Spencer, Forrest ; Hieter, Philip. / The CHL1(CTF1) gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for chromosome transmission and normal cell cycle progression in G2/M. In: The EMBO journal. 1990 ; Vol. 9, No. 13. pp. 4347-4358.
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