The Capute scales: CAT/CLAMS - A pediatric assessment tool for the early detection of mental retardation and communicative disorders

Mary L. O'Connor Leppert, Theresa P. Shank, Bruce K. Shapiro, Arnold J. Capute

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The early identification of communication disorders and mental retardation necessitates an assessment measure that differentiates these two disorders in infancy and early childhood. The Cognitive Adaptive Test/Clinical Linguistic and Auditory Milestone Scale (CAT/CLAMS) was devised to diagnose global cognitive delay and language delay by evaluating language and problem-solving skills independently. It does so in an efficient and accurate manner that differentiates type and degree of delay. The use of CAT/CLAMS is well established in populations of children thought to be either delayed or at risk of delay. This article reports the use of the CAT/CLAMS for identifying children with language or cognitive delay (≤75% of expected) in a cohort of asymptomatic children with no known risk for delay. When compared with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II, the CAT/CLAMS was effective in identifying delay. In a primary care setting, the CAT/CLAMS proved to be a practical, reliable assessment tool for identifying and quantifying delays in language and cognition in children 36 months of age or younger.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-19
Number of pages6
JournalMental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Keywords

  • Assessment measures
  • CAT/CLAMS
  • Early identification
  • Mental retardation
  • Preschool communicative disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Genetics(clinical)

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