The burst-suppression electroencephalogram

E. Niedermeyer, David L. Sherman, Romergryko Geocadin, H. Christian Hansen, Daniel F Hanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The burst-suppression (BS) pattern of the EEG occurs in a rather limited number of conditions. It has been observed in deep stages of general anesthesia and in conjunction with sedative overdoses. It is also known to occur in the wake of cardiorespiratory arrest. Undercutting of the cortex has been found to result in BS activity. Rare neonatal epileptic encephalopathies also give rise to BS. Our personal interest was prompted by the consistent finding of BS activity in rats following cerebral anoxia (nitrogen inhalation, airway obstruction): after periods of EEG flatness, BS activity developed, followed by periodic bursts and diffuse slowing. On the other hand, earlier literature (before 1960) showed virtually no observation of BS, neither in anoxic patients, nor in animal experiments. It is likely that the introduction of modern intensive care treatment has engineered episodes of BS activity, probably due to modifications of the anoxic cerebral pathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-105
Number of pages7
JournalClinical EEG Electroencephalography
Volume30
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1999

Fingerprint

Electroencephalography
Brain Hypoxia
Brain Diseases
Airway Obstruction
Critical Care
Hypnotics and Sedatives
General Anesthesia
Inhalation
Nitrogen
Observation
Pathology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anesthesia
  • Burst-Suppression EEG
  • Cerebral Anoxia
  • Deafferented Cortex
  • Electroencephalography
  • Isolated Cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Niedermeyer, E., Sherman, D. L., Geocadin, R., Hansen, H. C., & Hanley, D. F. (1999). The burst-suppression electroencephalogram. Clinical EEG Electroencephalography, 30(3), 99-105.

The burst-suppression electroencephalogram. / Niedermeyer, E.; Sherman, David L.; Geocadin, Romergryko; Hansen, H. Christian; Hanley, Daniel F.

In: Clinical EEG Electroencephalography, Vol. 30, No. 3, 07.1999, p. 99-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Niedermeyer, E, Sherman, DL, Geocadin, R, Hansen, HC & Hanley, DF 1999, 'The burst-suppression electroencephalogram', Clinical EEG Electroencephalography, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 99-105.
Niedermeyer, E. ; Sherman, David L. ; Geocadin, Romergryko ; Hansen, H. Christian ; Hanley, Daniel F. / The burst-suppression electroencephalogram. In: Clinical EEG Electroencephalography. 1999 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 99-105.
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