The built environment and obesity: A systematic review of the epidemiologic evidence

Jing Feng, Thomas A. Glass, Frank C Curriero, Walter F. Stewart, Brian S Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We completed a systematic search of the epidemiologic literature on built environment and obesity and identified 63 relevant papers, which were then evaluated for the quality of between-study evidence. We were able to classify studies into one of two primary approaches for defining place and corresponding geographic areas of influence: those based on contextual effects derived from shared pre-determined administrative units and those based on individually unique geographic buffers. The 22 contextual papers evaluated 80 relations, 38 of which did not achieve statistical significance. The 15 buffer papers evaluated 40 relations, 24 of which did not achieve statistical significance. There was very little between-study similarity in methods in both types of approaches, which prevented estimation of pooled effects. The great heterogeneity across studies limits what can be learned from this body of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-190
Number of pages16
JournalHealth and Place
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

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obesity
statistical significance
Buffers
Obesity
evidence
effect
built environment
literature
method

Keywords

  • Built environment
  • Contextual effects
  • Food environment
  • Land use
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

The built environment and obesity : A systematic review of the epidemiologic evidence. / Feng, Jing; Glass, Thomas A.; Curriero, Frank C; Stewart, Walter F.; Schwartz, Brian S.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 16, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 175-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feng, Jing ; Glass, Thomas A. ; Curriero, Frank C ; Stewart, Walter F. ; Schwartz, Brian S. / The built environment and obesity : A systematic review of the epidemiologic evidence. In: Health and Place. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 175-190.
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