The biology of Epstein-Barr virus in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a B cell proliferative disorder that is associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an ubiquitous herpesvirus. EBV-seronegative organ transplant recipients are at highest risk. EBV infection in PTLD lesions exists in a latent rather than lytic state, making tumor regression in response to antiviral agents unlikely. Viral latency proteins drive proliferation of T cells but also allow T cells to target PTLD lesions for destruction. Augmentation of the cellular immune response via the infusion of EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells has yielded promising results in the prevention and treatment of PTLD in bone marrow transplant recipients. Efforts to extend this strategy to solid organ transplant recipients are ongoing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-212
Number of pages9
JournalTransplant Infectious Disease
Volume1
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1999

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Human Herpesvirus 4
Transplants
T-Lymphocytes
Bone Marrow Diseases
Virus Latency
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
Herpesviridae
Viral Proteins
Cellular Immunity
Antiviral Agents
B-Lymphocytes
Transplant Recipients
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology

Cite this

The biology of Epstein-Barr virus in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. / Hsieh, W. S.; Lemas, Mario Victor; Ambinder, Richard F.

In: Transplant Infectious Disease, Vol. 1, No. 3, 09.1999, p. 204-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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