The Autonomy of Lexical Orthography

Brenda C Rapp, Lisa Benzing, Alfonso Caramazza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Do we need to access the spoken form of a word in order to retrieve the word's spelling or in order to understand the meaning of its written form? In this paper we focus on the relationship between lexical phonology and orthography specifically in production and we present the case of a neurologic ally impaired individual who is often unable to provide the correct spoken name of an object although he may be able to write its name correctly. We argue that this evidence is seriously problematic for the hypothesis of obligatory phonological mediation and conclude that orthographic lexical forms can indeed be independently accessed for production without the mediating role of phonology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-104
Number of pages34
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
Volume14
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Names
Nervous System
Orthography
Autonomy
metsulfuron methyl
Orthographic
Lexical Phonology
Phonological Mediation
Allies
Phonology
Spelling
Lexical Form

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Rapp, B. C., Benzing, L., & Caramazza, A. (1997). The Autonomy of Lexical Orthography. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 14(1), 71-104.

The Autonomy of Lexical Orthography. / Rapp, Brenda C; Benzing, Lisa; Caramazza, Alfonso.

In: Cognitive Neuropsychology, Vol. 14, No. 1, 1997, p. 71-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rapp, BC, Benzing, L & Caramazza, A 1997, 'The Autonomy of Lexical Orthography', Cognitive Neuropsychology, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 71-104.
Rapp BC, Benzing L, Caramazza A. The Autonomy of Lexical Orthography. Cognitive Neuropsychology. 1997;14(1):71-104.
Rapp, Brenda C ; Benzing, Lisa ; Caramazza, Alfonso. / The Autonomy of Lexical Orthography. In: Cognitive Neuropsychology. 1997 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 71-104.
@article{00c92f4a81554b6587780a9d7cadc6ac,
title = "The Autonomy of Lexical Orthography",
abstract = "Do we need to access the spoken form of a word in order to retrieve the word's spelling or in order to understand the meaning of its written form? In this paper we focus on the relationship between lexical phonology and orthography specifically in production and we present the case of a neurologic ally impaired individual who is often unable to provide the correct spoken name of an object although he may be able to write its name correctly. We argue that this evidence is seriously problematic for the hypothesis of obligatory phonological mediation and conclude that orthographic lexical forms can indeed be independently accessed for production without the mediating role of phonology.",
author = "Rapp, {Brenda C} and Lisa Benzing and Alfonso Caramazza",
year = "1997",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "71--104",
journal = "Cognitive Neuropsychology",
issn = "0264-3294",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Autonomy of Lexical Orthography

AU - Rapp, Brenda C

AU - Benzing, Lisa

AU - Caramazza, Alfonso

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Do we need to access the spoken form of a word in order to retrieve the word's spelling or in order to understand the meaning of its written form? In this paper we focus on the relationship between lexical phonology and orthography specifically in production and we present the case of a neurologic ally impaired individual who is often unable to provide the correct spoken name of an object although he may be able to write its name correctly. We argue that this evidence is seriously problematic for the hypothesis of obligatory phonological mediation and conclude that orthographic lexical forms can indeed be independently accessed for production without the mediating role of phonology.

AB - Do we need to access the spoken form of a word in order to retrieve the word's spelling or in order to understand the meaning of its written form? In this paper we focus on the relationship between lexical phonology and orthography specifically in production and we present the case of a neurologic ally impaired individual who is often unable to provide the correct spoken name of an object although he may be able to write its name correctly. We argue that this evidence is seriously problematic for the hypothesis of obligatory phonological mediation and conclude that orthographic lexical forms can indeed be independently accessed for production without the mediating role of phonology.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0002462089&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0002462089&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0002462089

VL - 14

SP - 71

EP - 104

JO - Cognitive Neuropsychology

JF - Cognitive Neuropsychology

SN - 0264-3294

IS - 1

ER -