The associations between body mass index, smoking, and alcohol intake with ovarian volume in midlife women

Lisa Gallicchio, Susan R. Miller, Judith Kiefer, Teresa Greene, Howard A Zacur, Jodi A. Flaws

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Despite the fact that ovarian volume is a marker of reproductive aging, there is little understanding of factors related to ovarian volume among aging women. The objective of this analysis was to examine the associations between body mass index (BMI), cigarette smoking, and alcohol intake with ovarian volume among midlife women. Materials and Methods: Data were analyzed from 771 women (45-54 years of age at baseline) enrolled in the Midlife Women's Health Study, a cohort study that was initiated in 2006. At annual clinic visits, height and weight were measured, a transvaginal ultrasound was performed to measure ovarian volume, blood was drawn to measure hormone concentrations, and a comprehensive questionnaire was administered. Generalized linear models and repeated measures mixed models were conducted to examine the associations between BMI, cigarette smoking, and alcohol intake with ovarian volume, adjusting for age and race. Results: Age was significantly and negatively associated with ovarian volume. However, BMI, smoking, and alcohol use were not associated with ovarian volume either when stratified by menopausal status or when adjusting for age and race. Estradiol, but not progesterone or testosterone, was significantly and positively associated with ovarian volume overall and among both white and black participants (p <0.05). Conclusions: This study provides insight into the associations between BMI, smoking, and alcohol use with ovarian volume among midlife women. The findings are somewhat consistent with the published literature and, thus, indicate that these factors may not be clinically important in terms of ovarian volume during the menopausal transition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-415
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Body Mass Index
Smoking
Alcohols
Women's Health
Ambulatory Care
Blood Volume
Progesterone
Testosterone
Estradiol
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Hormones
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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The associations between body mass index, smoking, and alcohol intake with ovarian volume in midlife women. / Gallicchio, Lisa; Miller, Susan R.; Kiefer, Judith; Greene, Teresa; Zacur, Howard A; Flaws, Jodi A.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 409-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gallicchio, Lisa ; Miller, Susan R. ; Kiefer, Judith ; Greene, Teresa ; Zacur, Howard A ; Flaws, Jodi A. / The associations between body mass index, smoking, and alcohol intake with ovarian volume in midlife women. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 409-415.
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