The Association of the Use of Opioid and Psychotropic Medications With Workers' Compensation Claim Costs and Lost Work Time

Xu Guang Tao, Robert A. Lavin, Larry Yuspeh, Virginia Marie Weaver, Edward J. Bernacki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between the use of psychotropic and opioid medications with workers' compensation disability and costs. METHODS: The study population included lost time claimants injured between 1999 and 2002 followed to closing in December 31, 2009. RESULTS: Controlling for age, sex, marital status, attorney involvement, and spinal surgeries, multivariate logistic regression revealed that odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of claim costs ≥$100,000 compared with claimants who were never prescribed opioids were 4.3 for short-acting opioids only; 8.6 for any use of long-acting opioids; 2.8 for any use of hypnotics; 2.6 for any use of antipsychotics; 1.6 for any use of anti-anxiety agents; and 2.9 for any use of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS:: The use of psychotropic and opioid medications was associated with high workers' compensation costs and prolonged disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-201
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 13 2015

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Workers' Compensation
Opioid Analgesics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Lawyers
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Marital Status
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Antidepressive Agents
Antipsychotic Agents
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "The Association of the Use of Opioid and Psychotropic Medications With Workers' Compensation Claim Costs and Lost Work Time",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between the use of psychotropic and opioid medications with workers' compensation disability and costs. METHODS: The study population included lost time claimants injured between 1999 and 2002 followed to closing in December 31, 2009. RESULTS: Controlling for age, sex, marital status, attorney involvement, and spinal surgeries, multivariate logistic regression revealed that odds ratios (95{\%} confidence interval) of claim costs ≥$100,000 compared with claimants who were never prescribed opioids were 4.3 for short-acting opioids only; 8.6 for any use of long-acting opioids; 2.8 for any use of hypnotics; 2.6 for any use of antipsychotics; 1.6 for any use of anti-anxiety agents; and 2.9 for any use of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS:: The use of psychotropic and opioid medications was associated with high workers' compensation costs and prolonged disability.",
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AU - Weaver, Virginia Marie

AU - Bernacki, Edward J.

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