The association of calcium supplementation and incident cardiovascular events in the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

L. M. Raffield, S. Agarwal, F. C. Hsu, I. H. de Boer, J. H. Ix, D. Siscovick, Moyses Szklo, G. L. Burke, A. C. Frazier-Wood, D. M. Herrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and aims Many US adults use calcium supplements to address inadequate dietary intake and improve bone health. However, recent reports have suggested that use of calcium supplements may elevate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. In this study, we examined associations between baseline calcium supplement use and incident myocardial infarction (MI) (n = 208 events) and CVD events (n = 641 events) over 10.3 years in men and women from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort (n = 6236), with dietary calcium intake at baseline also examined as a supplementary objective. Methods and results Using Cox proportional hazards models, no compelling associations between calcium intake from supplements or diet and incident CVD events were observed upon multivariate adjustment for potential confounders. An association with lower MI risk was observed comparing those with low levels of calcium supplement use (1–499 mg) to those using no calcium supplements (hazard ratio 0.69, 95% CI 0.48, 0.98, p = 0.039). Relationships were homogeneous by gender, race/ethnicity, or chronic kidney disease. Results were also similar when the analysis was limited to postmenopausal women only. Conclusion Analysis of incident MI and CVD events in the MESA cohort does not support a substantial association of calcium supplement use with negative cardiovascular outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)899-907
Number of pages9
JournalNutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Atherosclerosis
Calcium
Cardiovascular Diseases
Myocardial Infarction
Cohort Studies
Dietary Calcium
Cardiomyopathies
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Proportional Hazards Models
Diet
Bone and Bones
Health

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Supplements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

The association of calcium supplementation and incident cardiovascular events in the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). / Raffield, L. M.; Agarwal, S.; Hsu, F. C.; de Boer, I. H.; Ix, J. H.; Siscovick, D.; Szklo, Moyses; Burke, G. L.; Frazier-Wood, A. C.; Herrington, D. M.

In: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, Vol. 26, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 899-907.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raffield, LM, Agarwal, S, Hsu, FC, de Boer, IH, Ix, JH, Siscovick, D, Szklo, M, Burke, GL, Frazier-Wood, AC & Herrington, DM 2016, 'The association of calcium supplementation and incident cardiovascular events in the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)', Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, vol. 26, no. 10, pp. 899-907. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2016.07.007
Raffield, L. M. ; Agarwal, S. ; Hsu, F. C. ; de Boer, I. H. ; Ix, J. H. ; Siscovick, D. ; Szklo, Moyses ; Burke, G. L. ; Frazier-Wood, A. C. ; Herrington, D. M. / The association of calcium supplementation and incident cardiovascular events in the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). In: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 10. pp. 899-907.
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