The association between protective actions and homicide risk: Findings from the Oklahoma lethality assessment study

Jill Theresa Messing, Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Sheryll Brown, Beverly Patchell, David K. Androff, Janet Sullivan Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study focuses on the relationship between women's risk of homicide as measured by the Danger Assessment and 13 protective actions. Participants (N = 432) experienced an incident of police involved intimate partner violence (IPV) and subsequently completed a structured telephone interview. Most women in this sample experienced severe violence and were classified as being at high risk for homicide. Participants engaged in an average of 3.81 (SD = 2.73) protective actions. With the exception of the use of formal domestic violence services, women in the high-risk category were significantly more likely than women in the lower risk category to have used each of the protective actions examined. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-563
Number of pages21
JournalViolence and victims
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Domestic violence
  • Help-seeking
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Risk assessment
  • Safety planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Health(social science)
  • Law

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