The Association between Perceived Racial Discrimination and Hypertension in a Low-Income, Racially Integrated Urban Community

Angel C. Gabriel, Caryn N. Bell, Janice V. Bowie, Anika L. Hines, Thomas A. Laveist, Roland J. Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the association between perceived racial discrimination and hypertension among African Americans and whites who live in a low-income, racially integrated, urban community. Hypertension was defined as having a systolic blood pressure 140 mm Hg or more, a diastolic blood pressure 90 mm Hg or more, or taking antihypertensive medication(s). Perceived racial discrimination was based on self-reported responses of experiencing racial discrimination in various settings. Using modified Poisson multivariable regression models, we found no association between perceived racial discrimination and hypertension (prevalence ratio: 0.96, 95% confidence interval: 0.90-1.04). Findings suggest that social context may play a role in the relationship between perceived racial discrimination and hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-99
Number of pages7
JournalFamily and Community Health
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

Keywords

  • hypertension
  • racial discrimination
  • racial health disparities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Association between Perceived Racial Discrimination and Hypertension in a Low-Income, Racially Integrated Urban Community'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this